HF2a - H.B.M. HOWARD'S  FAMILY IN RHODESIA
 
H2/5.[3]Gladys Maud Howard   =    Clarence Milton.
                     (1887 -  1980/81 )    [m.1911]    ( ?  -  ?  )
 
Gladys Maud Howard was the eldest of nine children of  Henry Benjamin Marshall Howard and Emmeline May Howard nee Warner and she was born on 15th. September, 1887 in King William's Town.  She married Clarence Milton on 11th. April. 1911  in Engcobo, which is in the Transkei, South Africa.  He was an engineer and consequently they moved about the country quite a lot during the early part of their marriage.
 
Gladys spoke of attending a convent when young and recalled her admiration for the nuns there and it was there that she learnt to play the piano, eventually becoming quite accomplished, so that requests were forthcoming for her to accompany various singers. Musical evenings were one of the family's main pleasures, although my mother always claimed that she, of all the family, had no voice or musical ability.  Later still Gladys taught music, many of her nephews and nieces in Rhodesia learnt from her and remember her well.   As Gladys married Clarence Milton in Engcobe on 11th.April, 1911 and Winifred married Ronald Marillier there on 28th. September of the same year, I presume that the family were living in that town at the time, but moved to Malvern, Johannesburg shortly after this.
 
Gladys and Clarence had two sons, Dallas, who was born on 9th.February, 1918 in Dordrecht and Keith, who was born on 25th.April, 1920 in Colesberg.  However, they spent a good many years in Grahamstown, where they had a nice house and charming garden, and it was while living there that their two sons, Dallas and Keith were educated at Kingswood College. Some time later they moved to Rhodesia and lived in Salisbury for a considerable period.  Their eldest son, Dallas was extremely clever, doing well both at school and when he attended the Witwatersrand University, which he did for about four or five years, during which time he resided at 'Graystones' with his Aunt Phyllis and Uncle Eric. He joined the South African Air Force soon after war was declared and married a very attractive girl called Joan Bouwer shortly before he was killed as a trainee pilot in an aeroplane accident on 22nd.February, 1942 near Johannesburg.
 
This loss was quite devastating for both his parents and Aunt Gladys really never got over the death of her eldest son. 
 
Keith was married three times; first to Dorothy Clingen in 1945, by whom he had two daughters, Anne born in Cape Town on 27th.October, 1946 and Susan, born in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia on Keith's birthday, 25th.April, 1954.  Sadly, Susan was killed in a motor accident in 1978 near Salisbury, while on her honeymoon, some years after her parent's divorce. 
 
Keith had a very unfortunate life.  Whether he was damaged at birth or suffered from lack of oxygen at the time is not known, but medical needs of this kind were given less consideration in those years.  In any case although he was quite able in many ways, he seemed to be very awkward, a bit uncoordinated and attracted trouble in a most unfortunate way.  For instance, when we were young all the boys were playing a game lying on their backs and shooting the girls into the air from their feet.  Keith sent me flying and I managed to break my wrist although none of the others came to any harm.  Another time when we were all swimming in the Cowie River near Port Alfred, one of the girls was newly engaged and showing off her diamond ring.  Of course it had to be Keith that dropped it into the water where we had no hope of recovering it.
 
In 1975 Keith was married for the second time, to Kathryn Saayman, but this marriage did not last as they were divorced the following year.
 
My Aunt Gladys had come down to the Cape where Keith was living in order to assist him after his first wife's departure, as she had stripped the house of all possessions even including his clothes.  We tried to help Aunt Gladys in a few small ways and visited her quite often.  Just as it seemed she had got on top of most of their troubles an unexpected disaster occurred.  A lady arrived on the Cape Town Railway station, where Keith was working as a porter, claiming that she had lost her bag and all her luggage!  As she was quite attractive, a group of porters gathered round to hear this sad tale and then allocated Keith to be her 'guardian angel', to take her home with him as he was not married and could look after her.  It turned out that she was divorced and the child welfare officers had taken her daughter into safe-keeping; the only way she could recover the girl was to prove she had a secure home environment for her.  Her plan soon became clear.  She determined to marry Keith and get Aunt Gladys out of the house and to this end she made life for her proposed future mother-in-law quite intolerable.  Eventually we stepped in and took Aunt Gladys back home with us to Gordons Bay and then set about organising for her to move into Nazareth House.  She lived there for some years but always made us laugh when, well into her eoghtoes, she said, "I am quite happy here and the nuns are very good to me, but I don't like being with all these old people!"  Most of the other resident were, in fact, considerably younger than she was!   Meantime, Keith's wife had run up huge debts at all the Cape Town dress shops, which Aunt Gladys kept trying to pay off.  We advised her to notify them all that she would not continue doing this and they should not extend any more credit to this spendthrift.   So, eventually the wife went off with some other man and a divorce followed.   Gladys then helped Keith with some of her small capital to move into a smaller, more affordable house and it was there he lived with his third wife, Babs.
 
Keith's third wife was  'Babs' Engelbrecht, whom he married  in Piquetberg, on 2nd. May, 1974.  Unfortunately, a couple of years later she developed dementia and was placed in Strikland Mental Hospital, where she died some months afterwards.
 
We visited her there but she was in a very sad mental state and Keith was most upset about her condition and also about the fact that her pension needed to go directly to the hospital, reducing his income considerably.
It was when we were in America that I received a letter from Keith's neighbour breaking the dreadful news to me that Keith had persuaded his mother to leave Nazareth House and move in with him.  The letter told of many quarrels they overheard concerning money, which Keith was demanding from his mother, causing her great sadness, and she had eventually died in his home.  This was on Christmas eve (24.12.1981 at 9.30 p.m.) before we returned to South Africa.  Although we had helped him on several occasions prior to this, we have not seen or heard from him since.
 
At a relatively young age, Gladys developed cancer and had to have a mastectomy.  At that stage of medical development, surgery was rather brutal and there was no follow-up of plastic surgery to alleviate the scars - certainly no assistance in the way of a prosthesis, so Gladys stitched up cup-like padding to insert in her brassiere.  Like her sister, Winifred she was always very clever with her needle and quite ingenious when dealing with problems of one kind or another.  When we provided her and Keith with sheets to replace those taken by his wife, the shop mistakenly sent some that were too short.  Instead of letting us know so that we could exchange them, she quickly lengthened them to the size she required.  Fortunately the operation she had cured the problem with cancer and she lived a healthy and active life until she reached her nineties.
As a child I had always been particularly taken with a tea set belonging to Aunt Gladys.  It was of fine china, with a painted design of nasturtiums, but the intriguing part was that the cup handles were not open, but were formed by a complete flower.  Before she moved into Nazareth House, she gave me a number of china pieces, such as two blue and cream, Dutch style jugs and a small embossed bowl, which she had treasured and I now have in the English display cabinet. She was quite the most meticulous person I have ever known, keeping every article of clothing in its separate plastic cover and she always dressed immaculately, wearing stockings and elegant shoes on her small feet.  And then, even in her eighties and nineties, she would go striding off in a very independent way!
 
From an e-mail received from Peter Davies 6.7.2002.
 
"We used to live next door to Aunt Gladys... She was a lovely 'old' lady and very kind to me when I was a boy.  I took Lynn to meet her when we were engaged and Veronica took her boyfriend at the time to meet her too.  By then she was fairly deaf and insisted on calling Noel (Veronica's boy friend) 'Doel', a name which stuck to him for quite a while afterwards.  She also kept calling Lynn (my wife) 'Mickey', which we all thought highly amusing.  We later figured out that she had heard me introduce Lynn as Lyn Mackay, and she'd missed the 'Lynn' bit.  Everyone was highly impressed with her.
As a boy, I used to shoot birds with my pellet gun and got into trouble one day when I missed a bird and hit Aunt Gladys' window, breaking it.  She sent for me and I went over in fear and trepidation, especially of Uncle [Clarence] trying to work out how many months of pocket money it would cost and what sort of beating I would get.  To my relief, only she was present at the interview and I apologised for breaking her window but explained that I was trying to shoot a 'toppie' that was eating her fruit (a good but not altogether truthful excuse).  She amazed me by saying she was quite happy for the birds to eat her fruit and then, having extracted a promise from me to stop killing birds (at least in her garden), she treated me to tea and cakes!  Guy Marillier (who was living with us at the time) fitted a replacement window and I can't remember if I paid anything at all for it.  I felt really bad about the whole affair.  No wonder we loved her."
 
H2/5.[3]Winifred May Howard = Ronald Frederick Strancham Marillier
                         (1889 - 1985)       [m.1911]           (1886 - 1980)
 
Winifred May Howard was the second child of Henry Benjamin Marshall Howard and Emmeline May Howard nee Warner and she was born on 24th. April, 1889 in Pietermaritzberg, Natal, South Africa.
 
It is possible that, like her older sister, Gladys, she attended a convent for some of her education.  By the time that she was nearly three years of age, the family had moved to Cala, in the Transkei and all her younger siblings were born in Cala, so apparently the family remained in that small town until at least 1902.
There was a small village school there, so she may on the other hand have received her schooling there.  Her grandfather, Ebenezer Joseph Warner was a missionary in the Transkei, originally at Clarkbury, which is about 66 K away from Cala and then at Butterworth, also in the Transkei.
 
She married Ronald Frederick Strancham Marillier on 28th.September, 1911 in Engcobo, Transkei, South Africa.  He was born on 26th.December, 1886 on a farm near Elliot, in the Cape Province, called 'Xalanda' and he became a farmer.  They had eight children; the first Cecil was born in Johannesburg, the second Jeanne was born in Elliot and the others were born after their parents moved up to Southern Rhodesia, that is the third, Kathleen at Concession and then two at Sinoia.  The sixth child, Althea, was born in Grahamstown and the last two in Salisbury. Winifred and Ronald had a long and happy married life together and celebrated  their 60th wedding aniversary with friends and family gathered around them in Salisbury.  Their eldest son Cecil and his wife, Myra, travelled from New Zealand in order to join the family celebrations.   Ronald died in 1980 and Winifred on 27/4/1985
 
[A write up of her early life in Rhodesia was printed in a book titled "Down Memory Lane with some Early Rhodesian Women", compiled by Madeline Heald for the National Historical Association of Rhodesia Matabeleland Branch, published by Books of Rhodesia in 1979.  The hardback ISBN is 0 86920 199 9, and the soft cover is 0 86920 198 0]
 
[This mini-biography of Winifred and Ronald Marillier  written by Althea Davies was sent to me by her son, Peter, by e-mail but as there were a few pieces missing I have taken the liberty of adding extracts from a book called 'Down Memory Lane with Some Early Rhodesian Women' compiled by Madeline Heald and printed  by Books of Rhodesia Publishing Company.  These extracts are clearly shown in square brackets.]
 
WINIFRED MAY HOWARD
(1889-1985)
 
Winifred May Howard was the second child and second daughter in the family of nine children of Henry Benjamin Marshall Howard and Emmeline May Howard nee Warner. She was born on 24/4/1889 in Pietermaritzburg, but spent her childhood in Cala, Eastern Province where her father was the local attorney.
She went to school at the Convent and later transferred to the Public School, where she trained as a teacher.
As a child, she was a tomboy, quite unlike her elder sister, Gladys, who was, in Winifred's eyes, a "queen". Winifred's greatest delight was to play with her younger brothers, Jack and Harry, climbing trees and running races.  She and Jack were particularly friends and got into many scrapes.
Winifred was very fond of her father and dreamed of working for him as a clerk when she grew up.  In her eyes her mother was perfect and could do no wrong.  Her parents' decisions were not to be questioned, and so it was that when the time came for her to consider a career and she wanted to train as a nurse, her father said that no daughter of his would ever do such a thing, so of course that was the end of that.  She was sent for a year to be trained by the local dressmakers, a training that was to stand her in good stead for the rest of her life.  After this she became a pupil teacher and when she had qualified she went as governess to the Hart family.
 It was while she was at home during the holidays that she first saw her future husband, Ronald Marillier, and was immediately impressed by him, never having had the slightest interest in "boys" before.
Ronald Frederick Stracham Marillier was born on 26.12.1886 in the Cape Provence of South Africa, the eldest child in a family of six of George Edward Marillier and Julia Marillier nee Muir.  George Edward Marillier was born in Keiroad on the original Marillier farm there. It is not known where Julia Muir was born, [in 1866 but her father lived at Dornock, Xalanga.]  Ronald and his brother were brought up to work hard, having to get up at 4 a.m. in order to clean out the stables and then start the porridge for breakfast before riding their ponies over the mountain to school in the village Elliot.  Ronald was a very mischievous child and used to tell with glee the story of how his mother and the coloured maid tried to lock him in the cellar after some misdemeanour; they sat on the trap door while attempting to shoot the bolt, but Ronald bumped and bounced to such good effect that they were unable to do so, and he ran away and hid on the mountain until after dark!  However, he did not escape the retribution that was awaiting him on his return from his father.
When he was 14 years old, he ran away from school to join his father who was in the Scouts during the Boer War.  It was not possible to send him back when he was discovered, as they were on the wrong side of the lines, so he was employed as a Scout against the Boers.  When he returned home, he was sent back to school to complete his education, which he did at the Marist Brother's College, where he matriculated.  He then joined the Standard Bank in Cala, where he and Winifred met.
Winifred and Ronald seemed to spend most of their courting days around the piano at either the Howard or the Marillier home, both families being very fond of music, and Ronald being possessed of a very pleasant tenor voice was always in demand for musical evenings.
Their mutual pleasure in making music continued throughout their life together, and a feature of the family life was the music which always [filled ?]the day, with all the children involved.
However, when Winifred wished to become engaged, it had to be kept a secret as bank clerks were not allowed to marry or even have intentions until they were in receipt of a stipulated salary, which was above that which Ronald was receiving with no hope of advancement for years.  This was in 1909.  Winifred continued teaching, and Ronald kept his eyes open for a way of improving his status.  At one time they [even] considered emigrating to Canada, as there was a scheme in operation whereby a young couple could have their fares paid if the husband worked as a farm labourer and the wife as a housemaid until such time as the loan was repaid.
However, news of the "new, young" country of Rhodesia was so exciting that they opted for that instead.  The Bank required a young man for the newly opened branch in Salisbury, and Ronald jumped at the chance of [(?) ] and adventure.  On arriving in Salisbury in 1910, he was told that he would be responsible for the "vault" - which meant sleeping in the hut in which the gold, specie, documents etc., were kept, in fact he used the sack as a pillow!  He was soon disappointed when it came to an increase in salary as he was told he did not have the right qualifications and could not expect any advancement.  After a time, he was offered a job as farm assistant and was delighted to accept and set off for the Mazoe district where he worked for Mr. Alan Davies.  In September, 1911 he returned to the Cape to claim Winifred as his wife after an engagement of exactly two years.  They were married from the Howard home, "Violet Nook", in Engcobo, and spent the first night of their marriage in the Marillier home on the farm Slaate, Ronald's childhood home.  His mother had decorated the main bedroom with long sprays of scented white roses from her garden, and Winifred often told her children about the lovely and romantic start to her honeymoon, which was spent travelling slowly up from the Cape to Rhodesia; first by horse drawn cart, then by train and lastly by Zeederburg's Mail Company.  At one point, [there was an incident while crossing one of several swollen streams ] and they nearly lost all their luggage and all of Winifred's trousseau clothes and linens were badly  water-stained, due to a sudden flood.  Eventually, after the long and tedious journey by train they arrived in Salisbury, from there Ronald cycled out to the farm leaving Winifred to come with the luggage on Zeederberg's coach as far as the halt at Rocky Spruit and were she was met by a donkey cart, which took them out to the farm, 'Benwell'.  It was very dry and the dust lay thick everywhere so that when they arrived no one could have told what colour they were, they were so thickly covered with layers of fine red dust!
[Their first home was a couple of pole and dagha huts.  There were no servants, but a young piccanin was persuaded to chop wood and carry water for Winifred and that was all the help she had for a very long time.  Neighbours were few and far between, so] those first years were very hard and lonely [as Ronald spent all his days from sunrise until after sunset] in the lands, {he had to, as there were no experienced farm-hands] and Winifred tried to make a home.  [The highlight of each day for her was a walk into the lands to take Ronald his lunch and a bottle of tea, which they would share under the nearest tree]  Water was very short and fresh vegetables and fruit unobtainable, so much so that it was a joy to find a few small wild lemons in the bush.  [Toward the end of 1912 they moved to another farm at Concession where they lived for eight years and] while they were living there, Winifred made a bit of pocket money by taking freshly baked scones and bottles of tea to the [Maredzi] siding where the train stopped for half an hour - I think it was twice a week - riding to and from the siding on her bicycle, with a child on the carrier and a piccanin following with the basket of goodies]  Her refreshments were always very popular.  She and Ronald used to go everywhere on bicycles in those days, so a visit to a neighbouring farm was of course an all day affair and not to be undertaken lightly, especially as the family grew.  Life was so rugged in those early days that it was deemed advisable for Winifred to return to the Cape for the births of her first two children.  The next two were born on the farm with the assistance of a live-in nurse, who also kept house and cared for the older children.  The fifth was born in the new hospital at Sinoia.  Then, due to illness etc. the sixth was born in Grahamstown, and the last two were born in the Lady Chancellor Nursing Home in Salisbury.  Winifred was one of the first patients and was there when Lady Chancellor herself officially opened the Home and made the rounds saying a few words to each of the mothers.  By this time, [just before the fourth baby was born] Ronald was able to buy his own farm, 'Montrose', in the Lomagundi district [once again living in pole and dagha huts until there was time (and money) to spare from the farm.  The house was a continually growing structure, as it was built more or less room by room over the years, with Ronald burning his own bricks, cutting and seasoning his own timber, and doing the building during the slack periods on the farm.]
[Winifred kept up her habit of taking long walks every day, and we children all enjoyed the evening walk, the newest baby being taken in his or her pram.  One late afternoon Winifred had taken the four children out to a large ant heap on which grew a huge tree.  She sat down while the three older ones played a game of hide-and-seek, and the baby slept in his pram.  Winifred heard a strange grunting noise close at hand and decided it would be best to get home so, calling the children, who were most unwilling but trained to be obedient, she hurried home.  When Ronald returned she told him about the incident, describing the noise.  It was discovered that a leopard had been having his afternoon siesta in the branches of the tree under which the family had played!
Names of families I remember from those days were the Shorts, Richards, Fords, Bellinghams,  Vaughans, Markhams and later the Pages and Smythes.

Jack Howard came up to Rhodesia after the First World War and although *none of Ronald's brothers followed him, [*an addition here reads: 'This is a mistake, Ronald's brother Edward (Ted) did eventually come to Rhodesia some time in the 30's & settled on a farm near Gatooma, after spending a year or so near us while he found a permanent job.] several Marillier cousins did, notably Lennox who later married Winifred's sister, Muriel.   By this time other family members had to move to Rhodesia which was lovely for Winifred as she was able to exchange visits with her sisters and stay with them from time to time.
Travelling to Salisbury was a major undertaking, and Winifred was sometimes left at the farm to cope while Ronald was away overnight.  On one occasion the farm labour force came up to the house during the evening, making a great noise, brandishing torches made of grass and banging on drums.  Not unnaturally, Winifred was afraid and, expecting the worst she gathered all the children into one hut, then taking a small rifle stood at the door as they approached and asked what they wanted.  They told her that a lion was prowling around and they wanted her protection!   Winifred showed them the gun and pointed out that it was too small to kill a lion, then told them to return to their huts and build up their fires and bar their doors, which they did, leaving rather reluctantly!  The next morning lion spoors were found near the garden gate, which was a great thrill for the children.
There were two major hazards to be faced by farmers in those times; one was fire, and the other, locust swarms.  There was no doubt that either could spell disaster.  It was terrifying and heart breaking to see the puny efforts of the entire family and workforce trying to drive off a swarm of locusts, which would appear to be quite unmoved, and in fact cleared the land entirely of every green leaf and blade of grass.  Fires were equally devastating, and there was the added danger to one's home and life. [I remember one day there was a huge bushfire.  It was an awesome sight sweeping across the veld, with only a few people trying to beat out the flames with branches.]
[Winifred's teaching experience was put to good use, as all her children were taught on the farm to begin with, going to boarding school eventually.  As the family grew it became necessary to employ a governess and] at one time there was a small farm school on 'Montrose' to which the neighbouring children came every morning in a cart, and were fetched after school.  One day there was a huge bush fire, which got out of control, and Mrs. Mc Diarmid had to drive the cart and terrified horses through towering walls of flame to reach our home.
[Their home was built on a broad ledge half-way up a hill; we had a beautiful view but, of course, there were drawbacks, the major one being lack of water.  All the household water had to be carried up from the well at the bottom of the hill.  Also the ground was very rocky making it a battle to grow a garden, but what great joy it gave Winifred when some little plant or flowerbed was a success... Labour was not plentiful and it certainly was not skilled; also there was very little money to spare on luxuries... with a large family of eight Winifred was always busy cooking, sewing, knitting and doing all she could to help the family exchequer.]
Illness and accident gave Winifred the opportunity to use her natural and instinctive nursing skills, as going to a doctor was out of the question except in the most dire need.  Ronald was putting a roof on the stables one day when he fell and broke his arm.  Winifred splinted it and when the doctor saw her work he said he could not have done it better.  On another occasion, a metal splinter penetrated deeply into Ronald's eye; the doctor when he was reached was too drunk to do anything, so Winifred applied hot poultices to the eye until the metal was sufficiently drawn out for her to apply a magnet to remove it completely.  The children and the workers were nursed through all kinds of illnesses.
Winifred made butter, [getting up at 5 a.m. to make it] which for a time she supplied to the hospital and hotel in Sinoia.  One of her duties was to supervise the milking and as she was such a good knitter, she always took a sock with her because she didn't have to watch while knitting socks!   She also used to hear our tables and spelling while knitting and watching the milking.
At one time Ronald kept pigs, and the day of the slaughter would be a tremendous event.  Of course there were no fridges so everything had to be done as quickly as possible, the work went on from dawn to dusk and well into the night.  It was very exciting for the children but hard slogging for Ronald and Winifred.  When all the meat had been cut, salted, hung, made into sausages and/or cooked the fat would be made into soap in a huge caldron, and the hooves I think were made into glue.  Ronald also kept bees and the robbing of the hives was another long day.  We would strain and bottle the honey, and the beeswax was used, I think, for making furniture polish.  Winifred kept fowls so that there was always a supply of fresh eggs and poultry.  She made her own bread and of course did all the cooking and baking and from time to time taught the children until they got ready to go to boarding school.  Her early training as a teacher and dressmaker were of inestimable value; she was able to dress herself and the family at the least possible cost, which was no mean contribution in hard times.  Winifred still found the time for the most exquisite and fine crochet work and embroidery and made toys for the children.  When the two youngest boys were small she made them each a Robin Hood outfit [of Lincoln green] and also a Tarzan outfit from a piece of leopard skin! [Most of our presents were home-made, knitted, stuffed toys, beautifully dressed dolls, houses and carts made out of the ubiquitous paraffin boxes and most of our furniture came from the same source.]
On most Sundays, all the neighbours would gather for tennis, each family bringing teas and lunches, which were shared in common.  I think the first tennis court was on Montrose, but later a club was formed and courts built on the most central farm; also a grass pavilion and a couple of rest huts.
Ronald had built an earth dam on Montrose, and made a boat so that we had lots of fun and healthy exercise rowing.  Swimming was of course taboo because of the danger of bilharzia, but inevitably there were upsets when someone rocked the boat!
[In those days, travelling was done either on horse-back or in a gig drawn by a mule.  The car was only used for long distances, such as business trips to town, which was usually organised to fit in with the school terms...]
[During the Second World War, Winifred was asked to be house-matron to the Sinoia School so, although her large family had by this time grown up, she was once again surrounded by children, and had piles of mending to do.  However, this was only a temporary job and I think Ronald was very thankful when she was released and returned to the farm.  Winifred never got out of the habit of working though, and in about 1942 took over the Zawi Postal Agency. Her daughters who were married and starting their own families, found themselves returning home, as most young wives did in those days when their husbands were fighting overseas.  So once again the old home was full of babies and children for a short while.  All the family, and many young men who had no family in Rhodesia, used to spend their leaves on the farm.]
 
[In about 1946 Ronald and Winifred left the farm and moved to Salisbury, where they still kept busy] Looking back, [I remember such lovely evenings at home and] the days were filled with the sounds of Ronald's laughter and Winifred's singing, a beautiful background to a happy and secure childhood; in spite of the hard work and lack of material wealth, we had a wonderful life grounded in love and a deep faith in God's providence.
In 1946 Ronald and Winifred retired from farming and moved into Salisbury where Ronald worked for some years with the Cold Storage Commission, being in charge of reception and care of the animals delivered there.  Ronald then worked for a while with a development Company supervising the building of culverts in the suburb of Strathaven.  Winifred continued with her dressmaking, being much in demand as a private dressmaker.  They developed a lovely garden and home in Avondale, later moving to a garden flat.
In September, 1971, all their children gathered to celebrate their Diamond Wedding anniversary; the party was held in the old home in Avondale which had been bought by Althea and her husband.  This was the first time since the celebration of Cecil's 21st. birthday in June 1933 that the whole family had been together under one roof.  Of course the family was   ??? augmented by the time the second party was held, and on counting it was found that exactly  60 people had been present - quite a strange and happy coincidence!
Ronald and Winifred were living with their youngest daughter in their old home in Avondale when Ronald suffered a mild stroke, and although he rallied for a while, he became very weak and was taken to the Princess Margaret Hospital in Salisbury where he died on 31st December, 1980, aged 94.
Winifred continued living with Althea, making visits to Jeanne in Strathaven, and David (Masvingo) and Guy(Chinhoyi) occasionally.  She continued knitting and crocheting, although as her sight had failed considerably she no longer did the fine work for which she had become famous.  When Althea and her husband sold the house, Winifred moved into the Waterfalls Trust Home.  She fell one morning while making her bed and broke her wrist.  The thing that upset her most was that she was unable to continue her handwork; she found the time passed so slowly.  She used to say she only wanted to "go home" as she was very tired and just waiting to be called.  She died very peacefully while Althea read her favourite psalms, on 19/4/1985, at the age of 96.
The most noteworthy fact in these two long lives was the steady flame of love which they kept alive, and which was such an ennobling and purifying element that it touched and warmed all who came in contact with it. God rest their Souls.
 
From Jennifer Jonson:
"Aunty Winifred was one of my godmothers and I was always very fond of her.  She was also my Sunday School teacher at one stage and I am deeply grateful now that she took her job, both as my Godmother and teacher, so seriously as much of my Bible knowledge today is due to her efforts.
She had very definite opinions and didn't have a great sense of humour but she was what my mother always described as 'such a good woman' and her sense of duty was of the highest.  She also managed to pass this on to her children, who are all people of the highest integrity and most caring of other people.
Like the Warners, Aunt Gladys, Aunt Flossie and my father, she aged very well and was active right up to the end.  She often amused me because she used to visit people in the nearby old-age home and always talked about going to help 'those poor old things', when they were about 20 years younger than she was!
Unlike her sisters, she was not into smart clothes or the possession of beautiful things, partly, no doubt, because she was never well off.  However, her skills at embroidery, crochet and knitting were unexcelled and she was never without handwork of some sort.  Her embroidery and fine crochet were absolutely magnificent and I am very glad that I have several pieces made by her.
I know very little about the details of the lives of her children as they were all grown up by the time I was born - in some cases their children are older than I am - but I got to know the three girls well after I grew up, and we always had the kind of relationship that the difference in our ages was never evident.  Kathleen I knew best as she lived near us most of my life and she was particularly fond of my parents.  She was really wonderful to them and often had Dad to stay with her.
Winifred and Ronald, when elderly, lived in Forfar Road and the Postal address was 'Emerald Hill'.
 
They celebrated their 70th. wedding anniversary on 28th. November, 1981 [Jennifer must have meant their 60th. anniversary in 1871] with most of the large family in attendance in Harare,(Salisbury) Zimbabwe, where they had been living since Ronald retired from farming in the Sinoia district."
 
When Aunt Floss visited us in Gordons Bay in 1975 I showed her a partly crocheted lace cloth that my Mother was making for me when she died.  I had kept all the extra cotton ever since then and hoped to complete it sometime but always 'chickened out' because crochet was not my greatest ability.  I asked her if she could help me duplicate the pattern but she suggested that I request assistance from Aunt Winifred as she was a very competent needlewoman and always willing to help others.  When, in about the November, I wrote as suggested, Aunt Winifred replied that she was very busy preparing Christmas presents for the family but, as soon as she could, she would do her best in any way, if I would send up to her the piece my Mother had made and the extra cotton, which I duly did. Imagine my surprise when in February the completed cloth was retuned to me, so beautifully worked that there was no way of seeing what had been added.  The cloth now covers a table in our bedroom and I have treasured it ever since.
Aunt Winifred was a real stickler for the principle that every child in a family should be treated exactly like the others.  Consequently, for instance, if she knitted a pair of socks for one son, each of the others also needed to receive a pair and so on.  When Andrew was about to be married to Christine, we sent invitations designed like letters to all the relatives but added a tactful note to say this was a notification only and that as they would not be attending the wedding, please not to feel it necessary to send a gift.  Aunt Winifred replied that ' as they had not sent a gift to Peter on his marriage, they did not feel it would be fair to send one to Andrew'.
 
Like Jennifer, I knew Kathleen better than any of her siblings as she spent a year or more at 'Graystones' for educational reasons.
 
 [On 4.2.2002 Peter Davies wrote: 'Kathleen's youngest daughter moved to England from Zimbabwe and lived in Worthing on the south coast' ... 'Kathleen part-owns the cottages in Forfar Road that my Grandparents lived in before they became too old to care for themselves and moved to live with my Mother nearby.  Kathleen is another great family person and visited Aunt Jeanne regularly at the Old Folks home in Umvirwe(? Used to be called Umvukwees) before she left Zimbabwe last year.  Her daughter, Felicity lives in South London (Kent)]
 
 I met Althea when she visited the Cape and was extremely upset when I learnt that she had drowned while on holiday in Natal. We got to know Althea's daughter, Veronica and husband, Peter quite well.  First, when they were in the Cape and then when we were travelling about U.S.A. in our motor van we stopped off at their home in La Canada, a suburb of Los Angeles on a few occasions.  They were a very nice family and Veronica has kept in touch with me, at first by post and latterly by e-mail, from then onwards, which has given me much pleasure.
 
Much later, when we visited New Zealand, stayed with Andrew on his small farm, 60 K north of Auckland, we toured about some of that country and visited Cecil and his wife, Myra, at Burrows Street, Tauranga.  They insisted on our staying a couple of days with them, in spite of their advanced ages, and this proved to be an especially pleasant time for us meeting them for the first time and we have corresponded periodically ever since.

Ronald and Winifred Marillier had eight children:

H2/6.ba Cecil Huebert Marillier, the eldest, was born 13.6.1912 in Johannesburg.  He became a carpenter and he married on 9.1.1937 in Bulawayo Myra Mayor.
 
Myra Marillier wrote on 19.2.2002: "When Cecil and I went to Port Elizabeth in 1938, Ida [Marillier] was working in the Post Office there and made us feel at home.  In fact she loaned me her sewing machine on which to hem the [baby] napkins for Lynette's layette!".
Myra  Mayor  was born on 1.6.1915 in Barry, U.K. (died 24.8.2009) and they have three children and 6 (? maybe more) grandchildren:        
7.(baa) Lynette  Marillier, born 6.5.1939, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, married in 1960 Peter John Goodhew.  He was born in 1939 in Kaitaia, New Zealand.  Divorced 1980. c.1.Peter Mark Goodhew; c.2. Lea Anne Goodhew; c.3. Russell John Goodhew.
 
7.(bab) Anne Marillier, born 7.8.1941, Salisbury, Rhodesia. married Peter Robin Harris in 1963 in Tauranga, New Zealand.  He was born 1941 in Rawene, New Zealand; c.1 Sean Andrew Harris; c.2. Megan Anne Harris; c.3. Callum Strancham Harris
 
7.(bac)Cecil Glyn Marillier, born 16.5.1945 in Queenstown, South Africa.  He married in 1969 (1st) Juliette Scott, who was born on 27.7.1948 in Dunedin, New Zealand.  They were divorced in 1995.    She is a successful writer of novels and Glyn is a composer, musician and academic..   They had four children: 
8.(aca) Eleanor Ann Marillier, born 5.5.1971 in Dunedin, N.Z. 1973.  She married Simon Morley, who was born on 27.3.1969 in Calista, Western Australia. He is a producer of computer software programs and she is a doctor.
 
8.(acb)Godric Andrew Rhys Marillier, born 19.1.1973 in Dunedin, N.Z.
 
8. (acc) Bronya Marillier,  born 24.11.1978 in Melbourne, Australia.
 
8. (acd) Benedict Simon Francis Marillier, born  27.3.1982 in Perth, Australia
 
Cecil Glynn Marillier married in 1995 (2nd) Elizabeth [Liz] Birute Whan, who was born in Germany, but her parents were forced to leave there and moved to England from where they emigrated to Australia with her after the Second World War.  They met through a common interest in choral singing and music in general.
         There was no issue of this marriage.
 
H2/6.(bb) Jeanne May Marillier, was the second child and eldest daughter of Ronald Frederick Stracham Marillier and Winifred May Marillier nee Howard.  She was born on 30th. June, 1915 in Elliot, Eastern Province, South Africa and died on Tuesday, 30.7.2002 at 8.30 at Malvern House in Harare, Zimbabwe.  She was married in Salisbury, Rhodesia on 24th.September, 1935 to Henry George Hearn, who was born in Queenstown on 8th. October, 1906 and they had four children:
7.(ba) Yvonne Polly-May Hearne born 28.8.1936, Rhodesia, married 1955 (1st) Isaac van Niekerk; two children; married (2nd) Kenneth (Ken) Wood in 1987.
 
7.(bb) Melody Star Jeanne Hearne was born 5.12.1944 and she married Robert Alexander Izzett in 1964 and they had 3 children: c.1.Tracey Brenda Izzett; c.2.Hilton Izzett and c.3.Murray Izzett

7.(bc) Felicity Mary Gay Hearne was born 6.11.1946 and she married (1st) Fred Reeder in 1966 and they were divorced in 1948; she married (2nd) in 1969 Robert Robertson and they were divorced in 1985; she married (3rd) Peter Yolland and they were divorced in 1999.

7.(bd) Rosemary Lorraine Hearne was born 20.12.1948 and she married in 1972 John Lileywhite
 
H2/6.([6]c) Kathleen Flossie Marillier, was the third child and second daughter of Ronald F. S. Marillier and Winifred May Marillier nee Howard.  She was born on 2.4.1918 at Concession, Southern Rhodesia.  She was married on 3.9.1939 in Sinoia to Alexander Anderson, who was born on 13.4. 1910 in Que Que, Rhodesia and died 1988, Salisbury; he was a bricklayer. 
 
They had three children: 
7.(ca) Heather Jean Anderson, born 1940 Salisbury, died 1972, South Africa; married Ian Storey; 2 children.
 
7. (cb) Janet Mary Anderson  born 1943 Salisbury; married (1st) Alan White and (2nd) Joe Roddick. There was issue of the second marriage
 
7. (cc)  Kathleen Winifred Anderson born 1946 Salisbury, Rhodesia and she married Aubrey Smith.  They had 3 children:  c.1. Gary Smith; c.2. Julie Smith and c.3. Warwick Smith.
 
H2/6.([6]d)  Eian Ronald Marillier, who was their fourth child and second son and he was born on 12.1.1921 in Sinoia, Rhodesia.  He became an Inspector of Animal Health and he was married on 2.11.1945 to Cynthia Winifred Duke, who was born on 3.3.1927 and they had five children:
7.   (da)  Anthony (Tony) Marillier, was born 3.6.1946 in Sinoia/Gatooma, Rhodesia and he became a Policeman; he was also a cricketer.  He married in 1974 Evelyn Douglas Sneddon and they had 3 children: c.1. Eian Robert Marillier; c.2. Douglas Anthony Marillier and c.3.Stephen Marillier
 
7.   (db)  Ronald David Marillier, born 1948; married (1st) Melanie ...? in 1971;  divorced 1983. They had one child Andrea Marillier.  He married (2nd) Elizabeth Mills in 1986 and they had 2 children: c.1. Lara Marillier and c.2. Kevin Mrillier
 
7. (dc)  Jeannette Winifred Marillier, born 1950 in Salisbury, Rhodesia. ( Twin sister of Donald).  She married in 1971 (1st) Graham Elliot and they were divorced in 1977.  They had 2 children: c.1. Jason Elliot and c.2. Jeannine Elliot.  She married (2nd) Alex Friend in 1982 and they had a child called Alan Friend.
 
7. (dd)  Donald DouglasMarillier was born 1950 in Salisbury, Rhodesia (Twin brother of Jeanette). He married in 1974 Gail Crosswaite and they were divorced in 1992; they had 2 children: c.1. Nicolas Marillier and c.2. Lisa Marillier.  He married in 1966 (2nd) Jan Greef
 
7.  (de)  Colleen Alma Marillier, born 1955 in Enkeldoorn, Rhodesia and she married in 1972 Roy Tapson and they had 4 children: c.1. Tracy Tapson; c.2. Debra Tapson; c.3. Brian Tapson and c.4. Wayne Tapson 
H2/6.([6]e) Donald Strancham Marillier,  the fifth child and third son of  R.F.S. Marillier  and W.M.Marillier nee Howard and he was born on 10.7.1924 in Sinoia, Rhodesia and he became a farmer. He died 5.12.1981, murdered on his farm 'Shubara' outside of Sinoia, Rhodesia.
            [ Information required on his murder, etc.] Unmarried.
 
From a copy of a letter addressed to:
                                                                                                            "18 May 1982 
The Director
Department of Natural Resources
P O Box 8070
CAUSEWAY    (Harare, Zimbabwe)
 
Dear Sir
 
OUTSTANDING CONSERVATIONIST : THE LATE DONALD MARILLIER
 
Thank you for your letter dated 29th March 1982.
 
The Umboe Rural Council unanimously elected to nominate the late Donald Strachan (sic) Marillier MSM to be a worthy candidate for a Certificate of Merit as an outstanding conservationist.
 
Don Marillier was born in Chinhoyi and died on his farm on 5th December 1981, he was a complete ecologist, he knew the names and habits of all the trees and grasses on his farm, he experimented with various legumes in his pastures, he knew the geology and hydrogeology of the district and the province intimately and was the power behind the initiative that started the Umboe Groundwater basin survey, he was a member of the Ornithological Association of Zimbabwe and studied the habits of one of the only 60 pairs of Black Storks that nest on this country for many years, he discovered the Nyala living in what is now the Mana Pools Game Reserve in the late 1940's and reported it to the Director of Museums who did not believe him until 1965.  He had the ability to wait and watch the happenings of the bushveld and was right up to date with the natural history literature of the day.
He was for many years a member of the Angwa North Natural Resources Sub Committee and the Umboe Rural Council, and represented both at National Conservations Congress and its forerunners.
He owned the Shubara Farm and also ranched Nyamakari in the Lomagundi District and lived at one with the Natural Resources on his farm, saying that there was enough maize for his cattle and his kudu, he probably knew more about the nocturnal porcupine than anyone ever will.  He was a countryman to his finger tips and a water diviner of extraordinary ability who kept notebooks on his forecasts with the results annotated into them after drilling proved the boreholes, the notes have since been described as 'priceless' by Dr Peter Wurzel the foremost authority on the subject in Zimbabwe.
 
Could you please table this inadequate citation to the panel selecting worthy candidates for Certificates of Merit and consider the late Donald Marillier as the unanimous choice for the award from the Umboe Rural Council Natural Resources Committee.
 
Yours faithfully
UMBOE RURAL COUNCIL
 D V ROCKINGHAM-GILL
SECRETARY
DVRG/pak'
 
From: an e-mail letter from Allan Marillier - 28.5.2002.
 
My mom and dad could tell you a lot more, but I know some of the detail [about Donald's murder] as well.  We were closer to uncle Donald than any of my dad's other brothers and sisters, as he was the only one who lived nearby.
I was working in construction, in 1981, based in a small town halfway between Johannesburg and Durban.  We were due to close down for the 3 week construction Christmas holiday over Christmas on around Dec 15th of 1981.  I had a phone call from my mom around Dec 6th that uncle Donald had been murdered on his farm.  I left as soon as I could, and arrived back a day after the funeral.  I went out to the farm with my mom and dad, and we climbed a hill, which overlooks the farm lands towards the old farm house in semi darkness.  As the sun rose, we were sitting on top of the hill, with a small urn of ashes and a bottle of good quality KWV brandy.  We each took a small glass of brandy and had a toast to uncle Don, then took handfuls of the ashes and scattered them over the edge of the hill.
Uncle Don lived alone on his farm, and from what I remember, he came home one day and was attacked, with probably a revenge motive for his having been very active in PATU - the BSAP Police Anti Terrorist Unit.  Apparently there was money in the small farm office attached to the house, but the safe/cupboard had not been broken into.  Very little was taken from the house - but some things I remember were a small transistor radio and some clothes.  As I remember it, there was a rifle or shotgun lying on his bed, which was not taken or used at any time.  Speculation was that he arrived home from Sinoia, the bank, shops, etc. and went to put the money away.  He must have heard a noise and went out to see what was happening.  He pursued some people, who at some point hit him and crushed his skull with an iron bar, after which they drove his Toyota bakkie (light truck) over him and escaped, leaving him to die.
I don't know, and really doubt if the police ever caught the culprits.  There were stories of hit-lists, names of people who were to be targeted to be taken out after the Zimbabwean independence of 1980, and apparently uncle Don was on the list.
That was a traumatic time for all involved - my mom and dad in particular as they were so close to uncle Don.  I was close to him also, and felt their pain.  One of the worst parts for me, was that there were a number of dogs living on the farm.  They were taken by some neighbours, all but one dog who was mostly wild.
This part becomes a bit gruesome, and still makes me feel sad, and think of him whenever I tell the story.  Uncle Don was a real animal person, and he was the only person who could get near the dog.  She had been pregnant and had puppies close to the time of his murder, and once he was killed, she took her pups and hid them in an old ant hole.
It was decided that the best thing would be to try to find where she had hidden the pups, then kill her as she would never accept anyone else and could even be vicious if she felt threatened.  In turn, she would teach her pups to be wild, and the problems with attacking farm animals could result.  I was given the unpleasant job of following the dog, and then shooting her, because my dad just couldn't face it himself.  We put out some sort of bait to attract her, and once she had it, I started following.  I ended up running through the farm lands chasing her, until I could see where she was headed, and shot her while we were running at full speed.  We did save the pups, and they all went to homes, but that day, I felt like part of me had also died, that I had cut off one of my last remaining links to uncle Don.
I used to spend weekends with him on the farm, especially after my mom and dad moved to Umvukwes and Desi and I went to boarding school.  I was only ever allowed to shoot guinea-fowl and pheasant, and then only enough that could be eaten as food.  Any other killing of animals was virtually murder to uncle Don, so of course, the dog was a very difficult choice for all of us.
I still clearly remember the farm dirt road from the Sinoia/Karoi road, just beyond the Alaska copper mine.  It wound along for a few kilometres, until you reached the old, simple white farmhouse.  There was no electricity - all cooking happened on a big old black wood burning stove.  Light came from candles, or a paraffin burning pressure lamp, and bath water was heated in a tank with a wood burning fire.  No TV - just a small battery operated radio was all uncle Don had, and then he would listen to the 15-30 minutes of news on the radio at 8pm after his supper, then sit and read, talk, or meditate until bed time.
Breakfast usually consisted of fresh farm eggs fried in homemade butter, home made bread, porridge made from mealie-meal ground on the farm, and milk from the farm cows.  One time we found a huge mushroom while out walking through the farmlands.  The top was bigger than a dinner plate, and the root was about a meter long.  Uncle Don knew all about safe and poisonous mushrooms, so we had that for breakfast the following morning, fried in butter.
Supper usually consisted of fresh vegetables from the garden with some meat, followed by preserved fruit in syrup.  For a bachelor alone on a farm, uncle Don was a really good cook, and preserved a lot of different fruits and vegetables.
 
H2/6.([6]f)  Althea Ruth Marillier,  was their sixth child and third daughter and she was born on 16.4.1926 in Grahamstown.  She was married in Salisbury on 8.1.1944 to Ronald Maurice (Morris?) Davies, who was born 18.6.1917  in Cape Town and he became a Mining Surveyor, prospector and miner. Althea died in 1989, drowning off the beach in Durban, South Africa.   They had five children:
7. (fa)  Peter Eian Davies born 1944, Salisbury; married 1966 Lynn Mackay; c.1. Maxwell Peter Davies; c.2. Juliet Clare.  They emigrated to Britain.
 
7. (fb)  Barrie Vernon Davies born 1947, Bulawayo; married Elizabeth Peacocke; c.1.Vaughan Barrie; c.2. William Ronald; c.3. Simon Eric; c.4. Stephen James
                                       
7. (fc)  Veronica Ann Davies, born 1949, Bulawayo; married in 1970 to Peter Jones, who was born in 1947; c.1.Jason Peter Jones [m. Karina; c.(a).Linus; c(b). daughter] c.2. Virginia (Ginny) Ann Jones [m. David]; c.3. John-Paul.
      Living in Los Angeles, California.  
 
7. (fd)  Donald James Davies born 1953, Bulawayo; married Helen Barker in 1985; c.1. Cheryl Davies
 
  7. (fe)  Roy William Davies born 1960, Salisbury; married in 1982 Alison Williams; c.1. Sarah Jacqueline Davies; c.2. Clare Althea Davies; c.3. Leigh Ann Davies

H2/6.([6]g)  David Thraile Marillier,  who was the fourth son and seventh child of  R.F.S.Marillier and W.M.Marillier nee Howard and he was born on 1.3.1929 in Salisbury, Rhodesia.  He became an Engine driver on the Rhodesian Railways, married in 1953 Faith (Rose) Rosemary Grant, who was born on 28.9.1935 in Gwelo, Rhodesia and they had five children:
 
7. (ga)  Sharon Rose Marillier, born 1953. married 1973 Peter Gunning; c.1 Melody Gunning, born 1979; c.2. Mathew Gunning, born 1983
 
      7. (gb)  Eian Kevin Marillier, born 1955; married 1977 Alison Stokes; c.1. Michael Marillier
 
      7. (gc)  Hazel Joy Marillier, born 1957, married 1978 (1st) Robin Bain, divorced 1980; c.1.Sandra Bain; c.2.David Thrale Bain; married (2nd) Bryan Loxton in 1982; c.1.Cheylene Loxton; c.2. Graham Loxton, divorced 1989; married (3rd) in 1992 Roy White
 
7. (gd)  Frederick Mark Marillier, born 1960 Salisbury, Rhodesia; married 1980 Sue Topping; c.1. Laura Marillier; c.2.Kevin Marillier; c.3.Brett Marillier
 
7. (ge)  Basil William Marillier, born 1961, Salisbury, Rhodesia, married 1986 Sharon Truman; c.1. Karl Marillier; c.2.Sylvia Marillier

H2/6.([6]h)  Guy Howard Marillier,  who was born on 3.12.1931 in Salisbury and he became a bricklayer; a school caretaker; Manager of Ministry of Works, Umvukwes, Karba, Sinoia; Maintenance Manager, Richards Bay.  He married Phyllis Nora Webster, in the Presbyterian Church in Salisbury on 5.10.1957 and she was born on 15.11.1938.
         [Refer to the Marillier family connection below for Russell Marillier, seventh child of Frederic James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart, as he was the grandfather of Phyllis Nora Webster].  They retired to Steynsburg, South Africa.There were two children of the marriage of Guy Howard Marillier and Phyllis Nora Marillier nee Webster and they were: 
7. (ha)  Desiree Cherie Marillier,  born 9.6.1968, married 25.9.1982 Donald Peter Powell in Durban, Natal; c.1. Nicole Powell
 
 7. (hb)  Ivan Allan Marillier , born 26.1.1960 in Salisbury, Rhodesia, married 30.12.1984 Anne Gillian Botha in Durban, Natal, she was the daughter of Daniel Laurens Botha and Stella Joan Clarke; c.1.Pascal Marc Marillier; c.2. Jene Monique Marillier.  
            His Occupations: Surveyor; Civil Engineer, Computer programmer; Network Administrator; Unix Systems Administrator.
 
Phyllis Marillier nee Webster wrote from 33, President St., Steynsburg on 5.3.2002:
 
'We left after Rhodesia had become Zim and got to SA [South Africa] July 1982.  Guy worked in Richard's Bay where we had no wish to retire as too hot and humid.  We joined an organization ROOP   the full name of which (in English) was 'save our Platteland' and which had lists of houses at very reasonable prices in all sorts of rural areas.  We looked at houses in a number of places to retire to and ended up in Steynsburg.  Well, in Rhodesia, in Sinoia, where we were for years the saying was that "Sinoia was made up of white ants and Marilliers, so shake a tree and a Marillier falls out".
 
Phyllis Marillier nee Webster wrote on 5.3.2002:
 
'Guy's father did die on 31st. December, 1980 from a stroke suffered two weeks before he died, not earlier in the year.  He spent the two weeks in hospital where he died.  Mother [Winifred] was living with Althea, Peter [Davies] mother.  They did celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary at the home of Althea, who was living in the house that had been owned by Mother & Dad.  Cecil did come out from New Zealand for the event and there were well over sixty family and extended family members present which included my parents.  My Mother was a cousin to Guy's parents.'
 
Latterly, contact has been made between me and Winifred and Ronald's grandsons, Glyn Marillier, Phyllis Marillier nee Webster and Peter Davies, who are also interested in genealogy and we have exchanged information about their branch of the family to our mutual benefit, including that about the very early history of the Marillier family and the Howard Bible dating back to 1813.
 
Consequently much of the information on the Marillier Family Connection I received from either Glyn Marillier in Australia,[present e-mail address: glymaril@iinet.net.au ] Peter Davies in England [e-mail:  peter.e.davies@lineone.net ] or from the  detailed Marillier family tree placed on the internet and compiled by Ivan (Allan) Allan Marillier http://geocities.com/amarillier/Family ]as follows:
 
GENERAL NOTES ON THE FAMILY
 

 
"MARILLIER"
 
Photo: The Abbey of Romainmotier as it appeared in the (early?) 20th Century

The Matricularii of the See of Sion, and the Priory of Romainmotier.

     Attached to Princely Houses and Religious Communities of Central Europe in the middle ages were certain hereditary offices; the holders of these were known as Ministerii (Ministeriales) and the families in which these offices were vested, were designated Ministerial.
 
     Ministerii, as such, ranked with the lesser nobility, but so largely privileged were Ministerial Offices when connected with greater Noble and Religious households, that they were frequently held by members of the most important feudal families.
 
     Many of these hereditary offices were held as feudal fiefs, and in the 12th and 13th centuries, before surnames became settled, families holding such offices often
assumed as a patronymic the designation of their official fief, as similarly a territorial fief usually gave its name to its possessors.
 
     Among the offices attached to the ancient See of Sion, (Valais) and the Priory of Romainmotier (Pays de Vaud) was that of 'Matricularius', in medieval French, Mariglier, Maruglier, Marillier, Marlier etc; the duties of this office had to do chiefly with the temporalities and general care of the ecclesiastical property.*
_______
 
*These feudal Ministerial Marugliers must not be confused with 'Marugliers Paroissial', or Marugliers d'Honneur, whose offices were only temporary.
 
(end of  p. 1. in original manuscript letter)
 
             2.   The Matricularii
 
     The See of Sion and the Territory of Romainmotier, being in themselves feudal seigneuries, the office of Matricularius was in both cases a strictly hereditary feudal fief and in each instance gave a surname to the family holding it.
 
     The Matricularii of Sion can be traced back from early in the 12th century. In the 13th century they possessed the fief of Bramois near Sion, in the 14th century they had acquired the bourgeoisie of Aigle, and in the 15th century, when insurrections ruined and scattered the Valaisian aristocracy, the chief property and residence of the family
was at Naters, then the capital of the upper Valais. During the 16th century the family became much connected with the Canton Fribourg, and branches, which are still represented, established themselves in the parishes of Palésieux, Remaufens, Châtel St. Denis and other places in the neighbourhood.
The family, which qualified as 'noble', is never mentioned by any other surname than Matricularius, or the French equivalents, the latter gradually settled into the form Marilley.
 
     The Maruglerie or Mariglarie of the Priory and Territory of Romainmotier was held from early in the 13th century, and probably earlier, by the younger branch of the seigneurs Eclépens, the nobles Grasset [Grasret?] d'Eclépens, of Chevillie, in the
Barony of La Sarra*, by the end of the century the hereditary holders of this office had adopted its name as a surname.
(end of  p. 2. in original manuscript letter)
  1. The Matricularii
     The principal residence of the Maruglier or Mariglier was at Vaulion near   Romainmotier.
 
     Towards the end of the 15th century the Maruglerie passed out of the family, many members of which had left the Priory Territory. Between 1490 and 1520 a branch
of the family became established at Pontarlier, Franche-Comté, and in the parishes of Provence, and La Brevine, in the Comté of Neuchâtel; this branch has been
represented in England since 1783. In early records the name has been written in a great variety of ways, but by the end of the 17th century 'Marillier' had become the settled form at Pontarlier and in Neuchâtel. Until the French Revolution the family continued to qualify as noble.
 
*After the conquest of Pays de Vaud by Berne and Fribourg in 1536, Romainmotier became a Bailliage including the Barony of La Sarra.
 
   There are quite a number of references, which you might like to look up when you go to France. I will send them to you on request.
 
   There seems to be a lot of unnecessary verbiage in this, but I have copied it as it stands.
[signed] R.N.M.
(end of  p. 3. in original manuscript letter)
 
(Transcribed 8th January 2002 by C G  Marillier from the original in his keeping, but preserving only original spelling and punctuation.)
 
[Page 4. (un-numbered) of original letter from 'R.N.M.']
 
Ex. Register of St. John's Parish Church, Hackney.
 
16/3/1708.      William Rosamond & Blanche Hackford married.
  1/6/1715       Francis (5th) son of William & Blanche Rosamond baptised.
29/3/1741       Francis Rosamond & Jane Clare, bach.[elor] & spinster, married.
  8/6/1742       John, son of abovementioned baptised
11/11/[17]44  Mary daughter of      '                  '
19/10/[17]46  Thomas  son  of        '                  '
  3/12/[17]49  William    '     '        '                  '
12/ 7/ [17]52  Elizabeth daughter    '                 '
10/11/1765     Francis Rosamund (widower) & Mary Cumberland (widow -
                       married   witnesses Thomas Roberts & Thos Rolfe.
31/10/1766     Sarah, daughter of Francis & Mary Rosamond baptised.
  1/10/1769     William, son       '           '                     '                  '
25/12/1788     Frederic Marillier and Sarah Rosamond, married.
  1/  3/1771     Mary Rosamond buried.
15/  1/1778     Francis Rosamond   '
  7/  9/1835     Frederic John Marillier of Homerton aet 75 buried.
23/ 6/ 1853     Sarah Marillier                '         '       aet 87     '
      Note the two last named were our great grand parents.
 
Florence M[arillier?] sent me this. I am rather puzzled as to why Francis Marillier named two of his sons William, one by his first wife and one by his second.
 
                                               [signed] R.N.M.
 
Our ancestors were quite long lived, were they not?
 
(Transcribed 8th January 2002 by C G Marillier from the original in his keeping, but preserving only original spelling and punctuation.)
 
[Taken from Marillier family tree, photocopied and supplied by Cecil Glyn Marillier, only son of Cecil and Myra Marillier;  'original source'  Winifred May Marillier nee Howard and copied by Myra Marillier nee Mayor (married to Cecil Hubert Marillier); with additions from Phyllis  Marillier nee Webster and  from her son Allan Marillier's Family database]
 
Note: 1820 Settlers are marked *
 
1.[1]Jean Frederic Marillier (1),  of Provence, Switzerland born 13.3.1759  He married Jeanne Henriette Dieday, daughter of... (?) Dieday and he died at Payerne Cantou de Vaud.  He was a French Huguenot who fled France during the persecution following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes and settled in Hackney, Middlesex in 1783.
 
They had 3 children; a son and then twins:
 
2.(1) Jean Abraham Franscois Marillier, born 1753, christened 17.6.1753 at Englise Reformee, Pragins, Vaud, Switzerland [no previous record of this son]
 
2.[2] Jean Frederic Marillier (2)  [See section 2[2] to follow.]
 
2. (2) Susette Henriette(Henrietta) Marillier, the twin sister of Jean Frederic Marillier and she was baptised on 13th. March, 1759 in Lausanne.  She married the Bailiff of Lucerne Canton de Vaud.  Issue (?)
 
2.[2]Jean Frederic Marillier, who was born on 13.3.1759; he died on 30th.August, 1835 at Hackney, Middlesex, England and was buried 7.9.1835. (He was the twin brother of Susette Henriette Marillier.)  He was one of the French Huguenots who fled France during the persecution following the revocation of the Edict of Nantes and he settled in Hackney, Middlesex in 1783. [Source:  Allan Marillier's database:'The French Revolution 1789-1799 saw the end of the French Monachy and its claim to absolute rule']  It is possible that he married (1st) Marie Marguerite Gatolliat and they had a daughter Jeanne Marguerite Marillier.   He married (2nd) Sarah Frances Rosamund on 25.12.1788 at St. Johns Parish Church, Hackney, London. She was the daughter of Francis Rosamund and Mary Rosamund nee Cumberland.  Sarah was born on 1.3. 1766 (baptized 31.10.1766) and died in 18.6.1853 at Hackney.  There were five children of this marriage:
 
3.([2]1) Jean Frederic Marillier, who was born on 16th.January, 1790 (Christened 14.2.1790 at St Jihn Hackney, London) and he died on 11th.July, 1864 at Hackney. He became a tea planter and he married Elizabeth King, the daughter of ... (?) King 30.4.1809 at St Michael Cornhill, London.  She was born 10.3.1791 and died on 31st.July, 1842.  They had two daughters:
 
4.(1a) Mary Marillier (Christened 3.6.1810 at St. John, Hackney, London)
 
4.(1b) Elizabeth Louisia (?) Marillier (Christened 3.6.1810 at St. John, Hackney, London.)
 
3.([2]2) Louisa Henriette (Henrietta) Marillier, who was born on 10th. March 1791 (Christened 26.7.1812 at St John, Hackney, London) and died 21st January, 1810. [Note that Source: http://familysearch.org has a Louisa Harriot (??) christened 10.4.1791 and Louisa Henrietta christened 26.7.1812 at St John, Hackney, London]
 
3.([2][3]) Philip Richard Marillier*, who was the third child of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Mariller nee Rosamund was born on 18th.February, 1793 and while still an infant escaped with his parents to London from France during the French Revolution.  Both Phillip's grandfather and father were Swiss.  He grew up in Homerton, Hackney, London and was employed in a family business. After the death of his first wife and child, he emigrated to South Africa in Bailie's party on the 'Chapman' and he became a Civil Commissioner and Resident Magistrate at Somerset East.  He had married prior to 1819 (1st) Louise Droid of Lausanne, but she and their child died in an accident shortly before he emigrated and he was married in South Africa in April, 1822, to (2nd) Frances Jane Clarissa Ford*, who was the daughter of James Edward Ford* and Frances Ford*, who also traveled with Bailie's party on the 'Chapman', with his seven children. Ford was the sub-head of Bailie's party from London and a painter of miniatures and his son, John Henry Ford became a member of the House of Assembly in 1848.  Frances Jane Clarissa Ford* was born in 1806 and she died in February, 1865 [as shown on Ford family tree lodged in the Albany Museum, Grahamstown or 24.4.1899,(?) according to the tree compiled by Russell Marillier or 24.8.1899 as shown on Allan Marillier's database] in Somerset East.  She was the eldest child of James Edward Ford (born 1770) and Frances Ford (born 1780) and their other children (her siblings) were (ii) Samuel Ford (born 1807); (iii) George Henry Ford (born 1809); (iv) Edward Stransham Ford (born 1811); (v) Adelaide Elizabeth Ford (born 1812); (vi) Jane Murray Ford (born 1814); (vii) John Henry Ford (born 1817).
      Philip Richard Marillier died on 16th June 1880 also in Somerset East.  Two children of this second marriage are recorded on the tree, but it would seem that there were six other children (not recorded there) and that his daughter Harriet married Robert Hart Junior, making a double connection between the two families [i.e. a sister and brother married a brother and sister, but this needs confirmation from the Hart family tree].
There was a letter, carefully preserved between two sheets of glass, in the possession of the Misses Eileen and Ethel Hart of Middleburg, Cape [in June, 1970] written by Phillip Marillier to his brother in Switzerland on 1st. November, 1819, prior to his departure from England to the Colony, which provides many details of interest concerning the emigration of the 1820 Settlers and is given here as follows:
 
To: 'Monsieur Marillier,
      Chez Monsieur Gaudain,
     Au Petit Chateau,
    Lausanne en Suisse.
 
'My Dear Brother,
Perhaps for the last time from this country I now write to you, it being my intention to take advantage of the offer held out by this government to such persons as are willing to become settlers at the British Colony of the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa.
About four months ago a grant was made by Parliament to the minister of Fifty thousand pounds, [presumably this was the amount because, unfortunately, the newspaper report from which this copy is taken converted the figure into rands and did not quote the original as it should have done!]  to be applied to the encouragement of emigration to this settlement.  This he signified his intention to dispose of in conveying the emigrants free of the expense of passage and victualling during the voyage, confining its application to such persons as might have the inclination and power of taking out with them not less than ten able-bodied individuals, above 18 years of age, with or without families, for each of whom, and proportionately for children, a sum of ten pounds should be placed in the hands of government to be returned on their arrival and location thereby securing to government the ability of the party.  To provide for their subsistence until the first crops should be reaped, and on account of each of which individuals, a grant of one hundred acres of land, making for ten families, one thousand acres, would be made to each head of party.
By this means, expecting perhaps to afford relief in a slight degree to the distress of the country (caused among many other causes from an excess of population) by sending away those destitute labourers who would thereby be provided with useful employment and subsistence for themselves and families and become useful members of society.
The distress of all persons except the rich in this country is so great that immediately on the intention of the government being publicly notified, the Colonial Minister received applications from not less than the enormous number of ninety thousand persons.  Not indeed the sort of persons contemplated but broken-down tradesmen, and others of small capital, which could not be advantageously employed in this country.
These individual applications were, of course, but little attended to, as not being in conformity to the plan proposed.  Others, therefore, joined themselves into parties of not less than ten heads of families, some of one hundred appointing one as their leader who should be their representative with the Colonial Minister to treat with him and obtain the land on account of the whole, who held him bound by a legal instrument (one each making good to him the sum deposited and providing for the maintenance of their families and servants) to share among them in equal portions on their arrival in the Colony the land which should be granted to the said principal.
Some of these people were accepted and other, of course, rejected; the grant of money not being nearly sufficient to ship off all such as had made application.
I had included my name in a party of 100 who made one of the earliest applications and consisted of the most respectable persons.  This party then had been accepted by the government.
We have had a meeting at which articles of agreement for our mutual advantage in assisting each other to the utmost ability had been signed, our deposits have been paid and we only wait the final directions of government for our departure.
In this party is also the whole family of a gentleman [James Edward Ford] at whose house in Homerton {Surrey] I have been lodging since last January, consisting of his wife and seven children, most respectable and well-informed persons, but from a series of severe misfortunes prevented from obtaining a subsistence here, also a respectable young man, a surgeon [Walker?], a friend of Mazzetti who introduced us to each other.  These will form the small society with which I shall be intimately acquainted in the foreign land at a distance of about six thousand miles from my native country.
It may perhaps seem at first sight an impudence on my part to quit almost a certain welcome here to follow what may appear rather a romantic scheme of emigration.  But my hopes of happenings have been disappointed.  I feel as if this were no longer the part of the world for me to seek it.
 
I have lost those domestic comforts which repaid me for all the daily crosses and disagreements to which I was exposed in the business with which I was engaged, but which I would have been well contented with, looking forward to the time when, by my exertion, I should have been able to retire with her whom I loved above all others, to the country and friends she adored which my connection with her could have rendered me, also most dear, and where we might have lived out our short pilgrimage on this earth with as much happiness as we could expect here.
All these prospects are destroyed; my wife and my child have been too hastily torn from me almost before I could say that I was happy.  These are the most secret dispensations of providence which ought to be borne without murmuring but I feel that I cannot bear patiently the bustle of commerce and the clash of interests of commercial men and have nothing better to do than to retire from the bustle of the world to a quiet and peaceable occupation of husbandry, which seems the only one congenial with my feelings.
Most persons hold the opinion that, from the situation of the new settlement, an opportunity will be afforded to speculative persons to improve their fortunes very considerably.  If this opinion be not correct I shall not be disappointed as I seek only tranquility after the hardships and privations to which of course all first settlers must be exposed.
The situation of the new settlement, according to the best information which we can obtain, will be at Algoa Bay, or still more eastward, at the eastern extremity of the project on the banks of the Great Fish River which abounds with excellent fish, at a short distance from the sea coast in a very delightful and fertile country abounding with game and at a distance above 650 miles [presumably, as again converted in the article to 965km] from Cape Town which is at the western extremity of the Colony. Our latitude is about [33 and a half degrees] and the climate delightful; of course much superior to that of this country for the production and perfecting most of the fruits of the earth.
We expect to sail in the middle or towards the end of November, of which there is no certainty.  If therefore there be time for an answer it will afford me great pleasure to receive one, giving me information of all friends to whom you have easy access.
Father has been severely ill but is, I hope recovering.  All other friends and acquaintances are, I believe, well ...
Goodbye my dear brother and believe me ever affectionately and sincerely yours,
 
[Signed]  P. R. Marillier.
 
P. S. Yesterday (Sunday) I was at Homerton ... Father is better and mother very well.  I forgot to say that I am now in London for convenience and my address is No.14  Buss Street, East Smithfield.
 
The ten children of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford were:
 
 
4.(3A). Francis  Louise (or Frances Louisa) Marillier born 17.1.1823 in South Africa(?) and died 11.6.1894 (or in 1899), Hackney, England. Baptised 27.1.1830 in Somerset (presumably Somerset East, S.A.) by Rev. William Wright.
 
 
4.(3B) Harriet Elizabeth Marillier born 6.1.1824 in Somerset East, Cape Province and she married  Robert Hart Jnr in 1842 and they had 12 children: c.1.Harriet Elizabeth Hart; c.2. Richard Phillip Hart; c.3. Sarah Jane Hart; c.4.Francis Clarissa Hart; c.5.Hannah Louisa Hart; c.6. Elizabeth Augusta Hart; c.7. Emily Jeannette Hart; c.8.James Ford Hart; c.9. Caroline Marillier Hart; c.10. Frederick Ford Hart; c.11.Charles Lennox Hart and c.12. Wilfred Hart.
 
 
4.(3[4])  Frederic James Marillier, who was the third child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford was born on 6th June, 1825 and died 29th November, 1909.  He married in 1857 Anne Margaret Hart, who was born on 6th.December, 1837 and died on 26th.February, 1899. She was descended from/or related to Lieut.-Col. William Hart*, who also came to South Africa in Bailie's Party on the 'Chapman' and who, as a cornet in the army in 1796 had taken part in the capture of the Dutch fleet in Saldanha Bay.   He became a farmer on  'Hillendale' (which was sub-divided in 1910)
 
The artist, Mitford Barberton cast a bust of the original member of the Hart family [Robert Hart] to come to South Africa and titled it 'Father of the Settlers'.    He arrived in Cape Town with his wife, Hannah nee Tamplin and daughter, Anna and another baby on the way, on 7th.January, 1807.
 
He was born, the elder of two sons, in 1777 at Strathmore, Lanarkshire.  His mother died when he was 14 and, soon after that, he ran away and enlisted (on his second attempt) with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.  With them he landed at Simonstown in 1795 and at Algoa Bay in 1797, from there they marched to Graff Reinet.  In 1800 he was at Fort Frederick in Port Elizabeth at the time of the naval battle between the French ship 'La Premeuse' and the two British ships, 'Rattlesnake' and 'Camel'.   After two years secondment to India, he returned to England via the Cape and in 1804 he was married in Guernsey, his wife's family originating in Surrey, England.
At the Cape he was ordered to form a regiment from the messengers who had been employed by the army into a Hottentot unit, being appointed, thereafter, adjutant of this, the Cape Corps.  It was he who actually selected the site, as a suitable military headquarters, of Grahamstown, where he built the first house, but after the disbandment of the Cape Corps. He was appointed superintendent of the Government farm at Somerset East.  This farm was bought in 1814 by Lord Charles Somerset from two Dutch farmers with the intention of providing food from there for the frontier troops.  Hart introduced merino sheep and horses to the area.
In 1821 a farm was granted, probably following a suggestion by Sir Rufus Donkin, to Hart, which he called Glen Avon and after Somerset East was declared a town, he was appointed a heemraad under the first landdrost. 
He died in 1867, but by that time he had ten children living and four who had died and he was buried in a vault set into a small hill on the farm.
 
There were eight children of the marriage of Frederic James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart:
 
5.([4]a) Phillip Marillier was their eldest son [Query as this child's name is not on Allan Marillier's Internet site and no further information to hand]
           
5. ([4]b)   Henry Robert (Harry) Marillier  was the second son of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart.  He was born 7.2.1858 in South Africa.  He settled in the Kei River area; in 1897 he married May Lillian (Lily) Norton, who was born on 2.8.1873 and they had six children:
 
 6.(ba) Henri (Norman) Norman Marillier born 25.2.1898, died 15.9.1976, married Jessie Eileen Schley.  They had 2 children: c.1. Noel Marillier and c.2. Cynthia Ida Marillier
 
 6.(bb) Melville Thomas Marillier born 24.2.1900, died 1984, married Sally Flanagan
 
 6.(bc) Lillian Ida (Ida) Marillier  born 2.7.1901 and died 5.9.1981, Sinoia, who did not marry.

From: Phyllis Marillier nee Webster - letter 17.5.2002

'Ida was a spinster, she never married.  She was once engaged and her fiancée invested the money her father had left her and vanished with it,  She did a lot of crochet work and she loved making jams and pickles for which she took a lot of prizes on the show.  We grew gooseberries and she would pick our gooseberries very nearly standing on her head making sure she found all possible, then everyone would get gooseberry jam.  She would raid Beryl's tomatoes and we would get tomato jam, etc, green pickle and cucumber pickle.  She patiently sliced the cucumbers paper thin using a razor blade, believe it or not.  She came to us every Sunday for years, and was staying with us just before she died in Sinoia hospital.  I have spells of ESP and had just sat down to dinner when I said Ida needs me. I had been at the hospital that afternoon but went straight down.  When I got there the nurses said she was fine but I went in anyway and found she had just had a stroke, couldn't speak and was obviously terrified.  I rubbed her hands with cream, talking to her all the time, which got her calmed down and relaxed so when she went about half an hour later she was calm and peaceful.  Lex had brought her brother Lennox to Sinoia from Salisbury and so Lennox had visited her that afternoon.  She was a fantastic person and had a good sense of humour.  If we were reaping mealies Ida joined in and even picked a cob with only one pip on it.  She did not like wasting anything, used to bring all veg peelings either for the fowls or for our cow or goats, etc. [then] complained that we couldn't teach any of them to eat onion, which peelings had to be wasted, bones for the dog, old fat & jam skimmings for the boy we had.  When my daughter was about five she said,' Aunty Ida you are a prostitute, aren't you?'  Ida and I both looked startled and Ida said, 'Am I a what?'  Desiree repeated it and Ida said, 'I hope not.'  Then Desiree said, 'Oh, you are a catholic then'.  Ida asked 'Do I have to be a prostitute or a catholic?'  Desi 'It's usual, isn't it?'  Ida was very amused and told the whole of Sinoia that Desi had asked her if she was catholic or a prostitute.'
 
From: Allan Marillier by e-mail 30.5.2002.
 
'I remember Aunt Ida well. Her flat/apartment was always full of all sorts of bottles of jams, pickles and other preserves.  She was constantly busy cooking something, and of course, as kids, Desi and I always liked the fudge, coconut ice etc she made.  I remember her visiting us every Sunday on the 15 acre farm my dad bought, and as my mom said - she always got in and helped with everything.

From: Allan Marillier by e-mail 27.4.2003.
 [This from Val]  6.(bd) Kenneth Melville Marillier born 29.4.1903, died 1933 of Blackwater Fever.  Not married.

I did not know Aunt Ida, and having her little suitcase of photo's and memories makes me feel I should/want to know something about her other than she was a spinster at one time engaged.

[This from Allan]

My mom could tell you more, but as I remember her, she was a very fussy, prim and proper old lady. She had a sense of humnor that didn't often surface, but when it did, like my dad's mother, most people were shocked. She had a flat in Sinoia which was always a mess with piles of stuff everywhere, no surface on her table usually visible, and with one room dedicated to all the stuff she made for sales, fetes etc. She was always busy cooking or sewing something. I think she was mostly into cooking - fudge, pickles, chutneys, coconut ice etc.

She was quite a hard worker, and used to come visit us most Sundays I think, on the 15 acres my dad bought 7 miles out of town. She would get in along with the rest of us and hand harvest mealies, fruit etc when necessary. She was totally averse to any form of wastage, and if we thought we had cleaned the gooseberry bushes, she would get in on her hands and knees and find another bowl full at the back, on the floor etc. When she made anything, we almost always got some, and any scraps that were left over, she used to dave and bring back to us for the animals to eat. She also made tomato jam which was my dad's favorite.

She was a hoarder, and would keep all kinds of stuff - her falt must have been a nightmare to clean up after she died, and as usual my mom probably did that, or most of it. (She always gets very involved with everybody around her - even now in Steynsburg, she is active helping all the older people, and sorting out their problems for them.) My mom has a few funny stories of Aunt Ida - one with me, where as a little boy I used to pick up odd bits of junk on the roads - screws, nails, washers etc. Aunt Ida did the same, and hoarded pieces of paper from presents, and string, even short pieces a few centimetres long. One day we were showing off our latest findings to each other, and made some trades - something like she thought she could use the screws, nuts, washers etc so she offered me some pieces of string which I was happy to take.

I seem to remember her being tall, but that may have been because I was so small. She was really skinny, and straight upright, no slouching and no time wasting. She had short white hair, which I think she tinted slightly purple/lilac which seemed popular with the older people at the time. She always remembered birthdays, and kept a stock of matchbox dinky cars for little boys, and other stuff, I assume dolls for little girls. Any time someone came to visit who had a birthday coming, she would go to her cupboard and pull something out.

I seem to remember my mom saying she could eat like a horse, so I assume in spite of being skinny she had a very good appetite. She used to drive a tiny little grey Daihatsu car, and wasn't scared of mud and rain on our clay dirt roads in rainy weather. She used to go sliding around all over the roads without concern for getting stuck and having to walk back up the hill in the mud and ask for help if necessary.
 
 6.(be) Philip Frederick Marillier  born 6.9.1903 and died May, 1979 and he became a farmer on 'Magog Farm';  he married Hilda May Pithey (Pithy?) and they had 4 children:
 
7.(ea) Anthony Leslie Marillier, who became a farmer and took over the farm 'Magog' in the Sinoia district after his father's death.
 
7.(eb) Jane Marillier, married ... ? Rothes Hausller.
 
 7.(ec)  Margret (Jill) Marillier,  who married Duncan Philip Moyes and they had 3 children:
 
 7.(ed) Dereck (Denny) Phillip Marillier who was farming in the Sinoia district, and the twin of Margret ( Jill)  He married ??? and had a son Philip Marillier.
 
6.(bf) Lennox Aylward Marillier , born 31.10.1905, who married (1st) Muriel Alys Howard, on 2.11.1927, she was the daughter of Henry Benjamin Marshall Howard and Emmeline May Howard nee Warner,  and the younger sister of Winifred May Howard.  [For further details see the Howard Tree]  He became a farmer and started working for Ronald S. Marillier on 'Montrose' before acquiring his own farm 'Kenilworth' in the Sinoia district.
 
Muriel was never very strong and the asthma she suffered from all her life eventually affected her heart and these two health problems were the cause of her early death on 6th June, 1954, aged 53.
 
Some four years after the death of his first wife Lennox Marillier remarried in Gwelo, Rhodesia on 14.11.1959 (2nd) Dorothy Lillian Gould nee Dalton and he died  on 9.8.1983 in Salisbury, Rhodesia.
 
       Lennox and Muriel Marillier  had 2 sons:
 
 7.(fa) Michael Aylward Marillier born 25.9.1929 and he became a farmer and a mechanic, first working with his father on 'Kenilworth' and after his father's death with his brother Lex.  He was married in Salisbury, Rhodesia on 9.8.1952 to Beryl Birch, who was born 15.7.1931 in Liverpool, England. It is believed that Michael Aylward Marillier trained as a Mechanical Engineer (?) , working with his brother on the farm 'Kenilworth' which they inherited from their father and he was in charge of maintaining the machinery and equipment on the farm.   They had four children:
 
8.(aa)  Cheryl Ann Marillier was born on 26.8.1953 in Sinoia, Southern Rhodesia.  She married ... ?
 
8.(ab)  Beverley Lyn Marillier was born on 22.5.1955 in Sinoia.
 
8.(ac) Pamela Alys Marillier, born 19.9.1957, Sinoia, Rhodesia.
 
8.(ad) Norman Aylward Marillier, born 1.6.1960, Sinoia, Rhodesia
 
 
Myra Marillier wrote on 19.2.2002: "I do not know the correct sequence of births, but I think Lennox was the youngest.  Ida went to stay with Lennox after Muriel died."
 
In 1936 when Michael was due to go to school, his parents did not want to send him to boarding school as he was a rather quiet, shy and nervous child.  So, they sent him to live with my parents for a year.  He was almost exactly a year younger than I was as we were both born in September.  While I attended the girl's school, Kingsmead, he went as a day scholar to the boys Junior school, Pridwin, which was just up the road from us, two blocks away.  He was never very happy as he missed his home and parents greatly, so they returned him to Rhodesia at the end of the year and made some other arrangements for his schooling.
 
7.(fb) Lennox (Lex) John Dallas Marillier who was born on 15th. March, 1932 in Sinoia and he married Shenagh Maucauly Whitelaw on 29th.September, 1960 in Salisbury.  She was born 10th.November, 1933 in Bedford, U.K. and they had two daughters:
 
8.(ba) Diana Joan Marillier , born 2.5.1963 in Sinoia, Rhodesia
 
8.(bb) Sarah Scott Marillier born 21.11.1964 in Sinoia
 
 
 Lex took over the farm on his father's death and Michael and family joined him, the latter attending to the machinery, while Lex ran the farming side of the enterprise.  He possibly married (2nd) Maureen Cable ???   In 1999 Lex was brutally murdered by his past employees from the Marillier Estates.  His third (?) wife, Mvorna, was also attacked in their bedroom on the farm and hospitalised, but she survived this terrible trauma. 
 
Message from Adrienne Rudland on 17thAugust, 2001:
 
?Lex's wife Mvorna or Voo as we call her took [the murder] very badly and needed counselling in London.  With the help of adjustment by her parents who reside in Zim for 6 months and England for 6 months, Voo now works hard to keep the transport company viable and running successfully.  They have avoided these latest troubles as the property lies on the western area of Chinhoyi.
 
Extract from an e-mail letter from Adrienne Rudland , 23rd.October, 2001.
 
"I printed out your letter and gave it to Sheryl, who is Mike and Beryl's daughter... I hope that the Marillier family and Voo might contact you as well.  I might add that Voo has done so well, standing on her own feet and running the transport business to be highly successful, considering what traumas she endured with the brutal death of Lex."
[To return to the younger children and descendants of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Marillier nee Rosamund ]
 
3.([2] 4) Jaques Gillaume Marillier (James William Marillier,) who was the fourth child of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Marillier nee Rosamund.  He was born on 24th. April, 1796 and died 27th November, 1851(?) at Leicester.  He married in 1822 at Hackney, Sarah Middleton Aspland, who was a minor and the daughter of Rev. Robert Aspland , who gave his consent. They had a child: c.1. Anna Middleton Marillier.
[Allan Marillier's database has Jaques Gillaume Marillier's marriage to Sarah Roberts  with a child Anna Middleton Marillier.  Also, the date of his death may apply to Frances Ford, wife of Philip Richard Mariller, the correction is difficult to decipher on the tree from Glyn Marillier.  Source of the Marriage (with consent) is from Pallot LiC Hackney 1822.]
 
3.([2]5)  Jacob Francis Marillier, who was the fifth child of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Marillier nee Rosamund  He was born on 16th June, 1798 and died on 20th November, 1875 at Harrow.  He became a Professor of French at Sandhurst. [Source: Marillier Family Database compiled by Allan Marillier] He was married at Harrow in 1822 Agnes Boully, the daughter of Dennis Boully, of Harrow, Middlesex. They had 4 children:
 
4.(5a) Agnes Frances Marillier (Christened 1.4.1842 Old Church, St. Pancras, London. Probably born between 1825 - 1830)
 
4.(5b) Anna Sophia Marillier; (Christened 1.4.1842 Old Church, St. Pancras, London.  Probably born between 1825 - 1830)
 
4.(fc) Jacob Francis Marillier (Christened 1.4.1842 Old Church, St. Pancras, London). Born 1825 and died 24.5.1916 at Hereford, England.
 [Source: Allan Marillier's database. For further details see ancestry.com database: Cambridge University Alumni 1261-1900, Record 134079]
 He became a deacon/priest at the Church of St. Pauls, Bedminster near Bristol.[More details given on Allan Marillier's database]
??c.4 Marie Louise Marillier (Christened 4.9.1843 Old Church, St. Pancras, London).  [Probably born between 1825 - 1830 rather than in 1843 as on Allan Marillier's database]
5.[2]6 Henri  Marillier was the sixth child of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Marillier nee Rosamund.  He was born on 26.3.1803 (Christened 8.5.1803 at St. Johns, Hackney)) and died 5.9.1885.  He became a Professor(?) at Harrow and he married (1st) Isobel Hartshire (Dame of Hartshire).  They had a son but his name is not known. He married (2nd) Mary Kent (Dame of Kent) and they had 1 child:
              
6.(6A) Charles Henry Marillier, born 1835 and died 30.3.1875 in Gibraltar. Scholar at Eton.  He was in the South African Military
[More details available from Allan Marillier's database]
He married on 4.6.1863 Margaret Morgan in the Cathedral, Grahamstown, South Africa and they had 1 child:
 
7.(Aa) Henry Currie Marillier who was born 2.7.1865 and died in 1951.  His occupations are listed as British military; journalist; partner of metal works company; owner art decorator company; writer.  He was a scholar at Peterhouse.
         [More details available from Allan Marillier's database]
 
5.[2]7 Joseph Marillier was the seventh child of Jean Frederic Marillier and Sarah Marillier nee Rosamund.  He was born 1.4. 1806 (Christened 26.4.1806 at St Johns, Hackney, London) and he died in 1807

[To return to the children and descendants of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier]
 
5.[4][5] George Edward Marillier, child and second/third? son of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart and details of concerning him and his descendants will be seen under his separate section 5.[4][5] to follow [towards the end] after the younger descendants of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford.
 
5.([4]d)  Edith Francis Marillier, who was the fourth child and eldest daughter of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart was born on 11.1.1865.  Unmarried.
 
5.([4]e)  Charles Martin Marillier who was the sixth child and fourth son of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart. He was born on 4.7.1862 in South Africa and he died 1942.  He married Sarah Roach and they had 3 children:
 
6(ea) Reginald (Rex) Charles Marillier born 1891 and he became a farmer in the Kei Road area.  He married in about 1921 Grace Kruuse and they had 5 children:
 
         7.(aa) Alan Marillier born 1928
 
7.(ab) Frederick Ernest Marillier born 1932; married Elise Schoeman and had 1 child: Jeanette Marillier
 
7.(ac) Charles Edward Marillier born 1933; married Audrey Elizabeth Konig and they had 2 children:
 
8.(ca) Charles Marillier born 1961; married Jenny Hillier; 2 children:
 
         9.(aa) Tarryn Marillier
         9.(ab) Lisa Marillier
 
 
8.(cb) Karin Marillier born 1964; married John O' Riordan; 2 children
 
7.(ad) Myrtle Eugene Marillier born 1938; married Desmond Colin Ferriera; 3 children.
 
7.(ae) Harold Mervin Marillier born 1938; married Ethne White; 2 children:
 
         8.(ea) Russel Marillier
 
         8.(eb) Harold Marillier
 
   He also married Brenda Hancock ; 2 children:
 
         8.(ec) Neil Marillier born 1961
 
      8.(ed) Cheryl Marillier born 1964
 
 
6.(eb) Frederick John Marillier was the second son of Charles Martin Marillier and Sarah Roach.  He was born 2.11.1892 and died 12.5.1927.  He settled in the Sinoia district, Zimbabwe.
         He married Dorothy (Dolly) Pritchard and they had two daughters
 
6.(ec) Douglas Clive Marillier born 8.3.1899 and died 1981 [Further details available from Allan Marillier's database]
         He  married (1st) Ida Acton and they had 1 child:
 
7.(cd) Sephton Douglas Marillier born 2.5.194 and he married Louise Florence Harvey in 1974.  They had 2 children:
 
      8(da) Pierre Robert Marillier born 10.11.1974
 
      8(db) Juan Andrew Marillier born 10.11.1974
 
 Douglas Clive Marillier married (2nd) Edith Marais and they had 3 children:
 
7(ca) Clive Cedric Marillier born 3.7.1950.  He married Janene ...? and had 4 children:
 
         8.(aa) Sharene Marillier born 7.7.1979. Murdered.
 
         8.(ab) Charne Marillier born 26.6.1983
 
         8.(ac)Brendon Marillier born 26.6.1983
 
         8.(ad) Rochelle Marillier born 1.7.1985
 
7.(cb) Barbara Marillier born 13.8.1953; married Desmond Bosch; 3 children.   Living in Stutterheim.
 
7.(cc) Lynette Marillier born 23.6.1958; married Graham Futter ; 2 children.  c.1 Tamaryn Futter and c.2. Jarrod Futter
 
 
5. ([4]f)  Margaret Ann  Marillier, who was the fourth child of Frederic James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart and she was born on 4.10.1868. She   married  Thomas S. Cooper
 
5.([4]g)  Russel Norman Marillier was the seventh child of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart and he was born 3rd. May, 1872 and died on 29.3.1951 in Ermelo, South Africa.  He married Agnes Amelia Fletcher.  She was born on 9.1.1878 in South Africa and died on 21.9.1967 in Kenpton Park, South Africa. They had 7 children:
 
6.(ga) Garham Croft Marillier; born 22.7.1904 in South Africa and died14.5.1994 in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.  He married Freda Mary Howard  and they had 2 children:
        
            7.(aa) Jean Margaret Marillier
            7.(ab) Elizabeth Ann Marillier
 
6.(gb) Nora Fletcher Marillier; born 16.1.1906, South Africa and died 29.3.1979, married Ivan Reginald Webster and they had 3 children:
 
7.(ba) Reginald (Rex) Russel Webster born 16.2.1931 Salisbury, Rhodesia and died 9.2.2002, Steynsburg, South Africa..  He became a Rhodesian Railways inspector and he married Elaine Ritchie.  They had 3 children: c.1.Margaret Webster; c.2. Colin Webster;  c.3. Lynn Webster
 
7.(bb) Olga May Webster born 30.5.1932 in Salisbury, Rhodesia.  She married [name of spouse unknown] and had 2 children: c.1. David and c.2. Gail
 
7.(bc) Phyllis Nora Webster born 15.11.1938, Salisbury, Rhodesia.  She married her cousin Guy Howard Marillier on 5.10.1957 in Salisbury [For further details see under section 7.([6]h) on Guy Howard Marillier]  and they had 2 children:
8.(ca) Desiree Cherie Marillier , born 1958
8.(cb) Ivan Allan (Allan) Marillier, born 1960
6.(gc)Olive Marillier was the third child of Russel Norman Marillier and Agnes Amelia Marillier nee Fletcher and she was  born on 19.11.1907, South Africa and died 28.2.1971 in Germiston and she married (1st) Charles Henry Biddulph.  She married (2nd) Hans Walter von Gruenewaldt.  There were 4 children of the second marriage: c.1.Niel Russell Marillier;  c.2.Erica Marillier; c.3.Barbara; c.4. Anthony
 
6.(gd)Russell Edward Marillier was the fourth child of Russel Norman Marillier and Agnes Amelia Marillier nee Fletcher and she was born on 15.7.1909 in South Africa and died 3.1.1981/4? in Salisbury, Rhodesia.  He became a Railway pointsman on the Rhodesian Railways.  He was unmarried.
 
 6.(ge)Hugh Maxwell Marillier was the fifth child of Russel Norman Marillier and Agnes Amelia Marillier nee Fletcher and he was  born on 11.11.1911in South Africa and died 7.5.1942  He was killed in active service, England.  Rear Gunner.  Plane shot down.
 
6.(gf)Denston Franklin Marillier  was the sixth child of Russel Norman Marillier and Agnes Amelia Marillier nee Fletcher and he was born on 25.1.1916 [or    21.9.1917] and died 3.6.1917
 
6.(gg)Raymond James Marillier  the seventh child of Russel Norman Marillier and Agnes Amelia Marillier nee Fletcher and he was born on 21.9.1917 in South Africa and died 13.9.1951 of a brain haemorrage in Babington/Ermelo, South Africa.  He received Springbok Colours and he was unmarried.
 
5.([4]h) Eleanor (Ellen) Maud Marillier,  who was the eighth child of Frederick James Marillier and Ann Margaret Marillier nee Hart was born on 21.6.1875/6 (?) in South Africa and she married Francis (Frank) Robert Marillier (who was a cousin as they had a grandfather in common) There were 5 children of this marriage.  c.1 to 5 ????? Unknown.
 
5.[4]  Caroline ? may have been another daughter of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart.
 
[To return to the eight younger children of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford]
 
4.(3D) Ellen Sarah Marillier was the fourth child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford and she was born in 1827.  (Probably in South Africa, with the possible date of birth as 2.11.1826.)
 
4.(3E) Philip ??  There was a Philip born on 7.10.1829 and a girl died in infancy but no further information available on either of them.
 
4.[3](F) William Henri Marillier (1832-1890) He was the eighth child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Hart.  He married Mary Hawkins and they had 2 children: 
 
5.(Fa)Ellen Alice Marillier (born 17.3.1858 and married William Wienand)
 
5.(Fb)Frances Marillier (who married Frederick Murray.)
 
William Henri Marillier married (2nd) Ellen Hart who was born 2.1.1841 (wodow of Stuart Dodds pringle and daughter of Robert Hart and Johanna Christiana Hart nee Meintjies.  William Henri Marillier and Ellen Marillier nee Hart had 6 children:
 
5.(Fa) Francis Robert Marillier, who married a cousin Eleanor Maud Marillier daughter of Frederick James Marillier and they had 6 children.
 
5.(Fb) P. R. Marillier  and he married S. Collard.  They had 3 children.
           [Source: Allan Marillier's database: P.R. and H.E. were members of the Kimberley Regiment of Volunteers who took part in the defence of the town during the Anglo Boer War]
 
5.(Fc) Margaret Emilie Marillier who married Edward Leonard Merrick and they had 2 children: c.1. Frieda Merrick and c.2.Albert Merrick.
 
5.(Fd) Hilda Harriet Marillier who married J. Dodd and they had 3 sons and a daughter.
 
5.(Fe) Henri Edward Faust Marillier who became a shift boss at Premier Mining Co. He married (1st) Florence Frieda Frames who died and (2nd) Sylvia Irene Rex nee Frames, widow of Percival Rex on 9.9.1913 at the Presbyterian Church, Kimberley.  There were 4 children of this second marriage:
                       
6.(ea) Merle Marillier married H. Bunn.  They had 2 children: c.1.Wendy Bunn and c.2. David Bunn.
 
6.(eb) Rosilie Marillier married J. Reilly and they had 3 children: c.1. Patrick Reilly; c.2. Jillian Reilly and c.3. Rosemary Reilly
 
6.(ec) Roland Ford Marillier.  He was missing in action on 31.5.1942  
         [Source:from Allan Marillier's database: http://national.archsrch.gov.za/sm300cv/smws/sm30df]
 
6.(ed) Donavan Ford Marillier .  He was killed at war on 15.1 1944.
           [Source: as above for Roland]
 
[To return to the children and descendants of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford]
 
4.(3.G) Richard Edward Marillier was the seventh child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford and he was born 2.10.1836 and was apparently baptized 1.3.1844, aged 8, at Somerset East.  He became a missionary and married the Chief's daughter.  He married 3 times and the children of the first two marriages are unknown.  He married (3rd) Martha Yako and they had three children:
                 
 5.(Ga) George Ford Marillier, the eldest child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford was born January, 1878, Mqanduli, Transkei(?); died 24.8.1932 Umtata, Transkei.  Trader at Dumbi Trading Store.  He married Maria Ellen Maschado van der Bijl.  They had 8 children:
 
6.(aa) Arthur Gordon Marillier, born 25 or 28.11.1904.  He
          became a doctor.
 
 6.(ab) Edna Maria Carmicle Marillier born 1.5.1906.
 
 6.(ac) Magdalene Adelaide Marillier born 21.1.1908
 
 6(ad) Esther Elizabeth Marillier born 9.3.1910
 
 6.(ae) Louisa Martha Marillier born 7.4.1913
 
 6.(af) Hilda Dorothy Marillier born 18.8.1918; married Abraham Jacob Conradie. 3 children.
 
 6.(ag) Vera Clarise Marillier born 17.4.1920
 
 6.(ah) Geoffrey Ford Marillier  born 22.12.1921
5.(Gb)  Geoffrey Marillier was the second son of  Richard Edward Marillier and Martha Marillier nee Yako .  
 
5.(Gc) Frank Henry Marillier  was the third and youngest son of Richard Edward Marillier and  Martha Marillier nee Yako  and he married Georgina Gaylor and they had 3 children:
 
6.(ca) Ann Marillier born 14.3.1926; married (1st) Stan Groenewald; married (2nd) Michael Parsons.  There were 2 children of the second marriage.
 
6.(cb) Mathew Marillier married Jackie Berry and they had 6 children;
 
7.(ba) Arthur Joe Marillier born 1956; married Manah ... ? Child: Cyril Marillier
 
   7.(bb) George Marillier
 
7.(bc) Harry Marillier
 
   7.(bd) Philip Marillier married Florence ... ? Child:   Margaret Marillier
 
   7.(be) Tommy Marillier had 2 children: Leon Marillier and Sonny Marillier
 
   7.(bf) Richard Marillier married Lilian ... ? and they had six children:
           
            8.(fa) Molly Marillier
 
            8.(fb) George Marillier ; Evangelical Minister; married a ... ? Child Nathan Marillier
 
   8.(fc) Nigel Marillier.  Living in Pietermaritzburg
 
            8.(fd) Martha Marillier
 
            8.(fe)Leonard Marillier
 
            8.(ff) Terrence Marillier
 
 6.(cc) Edward Barnett Marillier was the third child of Frank Henry Marillier and Georgina Marillier nee Gaylor.  He married Marjorie Sarah Lloyd and they had 6 children:
 
7.(ca) Richard Ruben Marillier born 3.3.1942 married Ester Harris. They had 4 children:
 
8.(ba) Gavin Marillier
 
8.(bb) Marjorie Marillier
 
8.(bc) David Marillier
 
   8.(bd) Adrian Marillier
 
 
7.(cb) Ronald Frank Marillier was the second child of Frank Henry Marillier and Georgina Marillier nee Gaylor and he married Marjorie Sarah Lloyd
 
   7.(cc) Barrow Marillier
 
   7.(cd) Alice Marillier
 
   7.(ce) Charles Marillier
 
   7.(cf) Pamela Marillier
 
 
[To return to the chidren and descendants of William Henri Marillier and
                                Ellen Marillier nee Hart]
                           
5.(Hc) Margaret Emilie Marillier was the third child and eldest daughter of William Henri Marillier and Ellen Marillier nee Hart.  She married Edward Leonard Merrick and they had 2 children: c.1. Frieda Merrick and c.2. Albert Merrick
 
5.(Hd) Hilda Harriet Marillier, daughter of William Henri Marillier and Ellen Marillier nee Hart and she married J. Dodd and they had three sons and a daughter.
 
[To return to the children and descendants of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford]
 
4.(3H) Caroline Jane Marillier born 1839 was the daughter of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford and she married G. M. Miller.  They had 3 sons: c.1.Charles Miller; c.2. Harry Miller and 3. Frederick Miller
 
4.(3I) Unknown daughter of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford
 
4.(3J) Sarah Marillier  the tenth child of Phillip Richard Marillier and Frances Jane Clarissa Marillier nee Ford. Probably born in South Africa (?)
 
4.(3K) Annie Emily Marillier  the eleventh and youngest child of Phillip Richard Marillier; also probably born in South Africa (?) and she had 5 sons and 2 daughters.  She married either B.Wienand or ...? Edwards. 
 
[To return  my closest family; the other children and descendants  of Frederick James Marillier and Anne Margaret Marillier nee Hart]
 
5. ([4][5]) George Edward Marillier, who was the second/third? child of Frederick James Marillier and Ann Margaret Marillier nee Hart, was born on 17th.November, 1859/60; he became a farmer on 'Slaate', near Elliot, Eastern Cape and he died in 1944 and was buried in the Elliot cemetery [Source: S.A.National Archives].  He married Julia Muir on 30.3.1885She was born in 1866 and died on 25.6.1950 at Queenstown, C.P. Her death followed a fall in a sink (?) bath, when she broke a hip and, thereafter contracted pneumonia. They were apparently living on separate farms after he had an affaire.  There were six children of this marriage:
 
6.([5][6]Ronald Frederick Stracham Marillier,  the eldest son of George Marillier and Julia Marillier nee Muir was born 26.12.1886 at xqlanda and died 31.12.1980/82?. Salisbury, Zimbabwe.  He married on 28.9.1911 at Engcobo Winifred May Howard.  She was the second daughter of Henry Benjamin Marshall Howard and Emmeline May  Howard nee Warner. [See under Warner Tree]
 
 Her father, H.B.M. Howard, was an Attorney and Conveyancer in Encobo and Cala, Transkei, however he had received his education and training in England; and she came from a family of eight children [See the Warner tree for details] the family being descended from 1820 Settler stock and the Howards [See their tree, too, for details] left Plymouth for South Africa in about 1825.  Henry Howard (1814-1891) being a Surveyor of Works in H.M. Royal Engineers, who spent some years in South Africa, mainly occupied in road building and brought his two sons to South Africa with him, but he died on 29.11.1891, in Plymouth having returned to England some time before that date. 
 
Note: Some of the older generation believed the family was related to the 1820 Settler  Thomas Howard and refer to newspaper articles etc. concerning him and other Howard Settlers.  But the Howards are a very large and wide-spread family and I have found no connection between our branch in Plymouth and the 1820 Settlers.  As will be seen from the Family Bible in the possession of Peter Davies, the grandparents of Herbert B.M. Howard and his father Henry were still living in Plymouth when he left for South Africa.  Henry did come to South Africa with H.M. Royal Engineers in about 1825.  He returned to UK but his sons remained in South African and died there.]
 
 
[For further details of Ronald and Winifred's life in Rhodesia refer to the mini-biography written by their daughter, Althea Davies and recorded on the file HF2 HMB Howard's Family in Rhodesia (Part 1) or an edited version in 'Down Memory Lane with Some Early Rhodesian Women' compiled by Madeline Heald for The National Historical Association of Rhodesia, Matabeleland Branch and printed by Books of Rhodesia Publishing Company,  Bulawayo, 1979]
                   Ronald and Winifred Marillier had eight children:
 
7.([6] [7]) Cecil Huebert Marillier, the eldest, was born 13.6.1912 in Johannesburg.  He became a carpenter and he married on 9.1.1937 in Bulawayo Myra Mayor.  She was born on 1.6.1915 in Barry, U.K. (died 24.8.2009) and they have three children and 6 (?) grandchildren:        
 
 8. ([7]a) Lynette  Marillier, born 6.5.1939, Port Elizabeth, South Africa.  She married Peter John Goodhew in 1960 but they were divorced in 1980.  They had 3 children: c.1.Peter Mark Goodhew; c.2. Lee Anne Goodhew; and c.3. Russell John Goodhew
 
8.  ([7]b) Anne Marillier, born 7.8.1941 in Salisbury, Rhodesia and she was married in Tauranga, New Zealand to Peter Robin Harris and they had 3 children: c.1. Sean Andrew Harris; c.2.Megan Anne Harris and c.3. Callum Strancham Harris
 
8. ([7][8]) Cecil Glyn Marillier, born 16.5.1945.  He married  (1st) Juliette Scott, who was born on 27.7.1948 in Dunedin, New Zealand.    She is a successful writer of novels and Glyn is a composer , musician and academic.   They had four children:
 
9.([8]a) Eleanor Marillier, born 5.5.1971 in Dunedin, N.Z. 1973.  She married Simon Morley, who was born on 27.3.1969 in Calista, Western Australia. He is a producer of computer software programs and she is a doctor.
 
9.([8]b)Godric Marillier, born 19.1.1973 in Dunedin,    N.Z.
 
9.([8]c) Bronya Marillier,  born 24.11.1978 in Melbourne, Australia.
 
9.([8]d) Benedict Marillier, born  27.3.1982 in Perth, Australia.
 
8.   ([7][8])Cecil Glynn Marillier married (2nd) Elizabeth[Liz] Birute Whan, who was born in Germany, but her parents were forced to leave there and moved to England from where they emigrated to Australia with her after the Second World War.  They met through a common interest in choral singing and music in general.
    
         There was no issue of this marriage.
 
7.([6]b) Jeanne May Marillier, was the second child and eldest   daughter of Ronald Frederick Stracham Marillier and Winifred May Marillier nee Howard.  She was born on 30th. June, 1915 in Elliot and married in Salisbury, Rhodesia on 24th.September, 1935 to Henry George Hearn, who was born in Queenstown on 8th. October, 1906 and they had four children:
 
8.(ba) Yvonne Polly May Hearn was born 28.8.1936 and she married (1st) Isaac van Niekerk in 1955 but were divorced in 1976.  There were 2 children of this marriage: c.1. Jerome Martin Kennedy van Niekerk and c.2. Rohland James van Niekerk.  She married (2nd) Kenneth (Ken) Wood
 
8.(bb) Melody Star Jeanne Hearne was born 5.12.1944 and she married Robert Alexander Izzett in 1964 and they had 3 children: c.1.Tracey Brenda Izzett; c.2.Hilton Izzett and c.3.Murray Izzett
 
8(bc) Felicity Mary Gay Hearne was born was born 6.11.1946 and she married (1st) Fred Reeder in 1966 and they were divorced in 1948; she married (2nd) in 1969 Robert Robertson and they were divorced in 1985; she married (3rd) Peter Yolland and they were divorced in 1999.
 
8. (bd) Rosemary Lorraine Hearne was born 20.12.1948; married 1972 John Lileywhite
 
7.                         ([6]c) Kathleen Flossie Marillier, was the third child and second daughter of Ronald F. S. Marillier and Winifred May Marillier nee Howard.  She was born on 2.4.1918 at Concession, Southern Rhodesia and she was married on 3.9.1939 in Sinoia to Alexander (Andy) A. Anderson, who was born on 13.4. 1910 in Que Que, Rhodesia and he was a bricklayer. 
Kathleen died in 1978 in Salisbury, Rhodesia.
 
They had three children:
 
8.(ca) Heather Jean Anderson, born 1940 in Salisbury, Rhodesia and died 1972.  She married in 1962 Ian Storey and they had 2 children: c.1. Kim Storey and c.2. Dale Storey
 
8.(cb) Janet Mary Anderson, born in 1943 in Salisbury, Rhodesia and she married (1st)  Alan White and (2nd) Joe Roddick.  There was issue of the second marriage.
 
8.(cc)  Kathleen Winifred Anderson, born 1946 in Salisbury, Rhodesia and she married Aubrey Smith.  They had 3 children: c.1.Gary Smith; c.2. Julie Smith and c.3.Warwick Smith
 
 
7.([6]d)  Eian Ronald Marillier, who was their fourth child and second son and he was born on 12.1.1921 in Sinoia, Rhodesia.  He became an Inspector of Animal Health and he was married on 2.11.1945/6? to Cynthia Winifred Duke, who was born on 3.3.1927 He became an inspector of animal health and they had five children:
 
 
8.(da) Anthony (Tony) Marillier the eldest child of Eian Ronald Marillier and Cynthia Winifred Marillier nee Duke was born 3.6.1946 in Sinoia/Gatooma, Rhodesia and he became a Policeman; he was also a cricketer.  He married in 1974 Evelyn Douglas Sneddon and they had 3 children:
 
9.(aa) Eian Robert Marillier
 
9.(ab) Douglas Anthony Marillier
 
9.(ac) Stephen Marillier
 
        8.(db) Ronald David Marillier the second son of Eian Ronald Marillier and Cynthia Winifred Marillier nee Duke was  born 1948; married (1st) Melanie ??? in 1971;  divorced 1983. They had one child Andrea Marillier.  He married (2nd) Elizabeth Mills in 1986 and they had 2 children:
 
9.(ba) Lara Marillier
 
9.(bb) Kevin Mrillier
 
8.(dc) Jeannette Winifred Marillier, born 1950 in Salisbury, Rhodesia. (Twin sister of Donald).  She married in 1971 (1st) Graham Elliot and they were divorced in 1977.  They had 2 children: c.1. Jason Elliot and c.2. Jeannine Elliot.  She married (2nd) Alex Friend in 1982 and they had a child called Alan Friend.
 
8.(dd) Donald DouglasMarillier was born 1950 in Salisbury, Rhodesia (Twin brother of Jeanette). He married in 1974 Gail Crosswaite and they were divorced in 1992; they had 2 children:
 
9.(da) Nicolas Marillier
 
9.(db)Lisa Marillier. 
 
He married in 1966 (2nd) Jan Greef
 
         8.(de) Colleen Alma Marillier the fifth and youngest child of Eian Ronald Marillier and Cynthia Winifred Marillier nee Duke was born 1955 in Enkeldoorn, Rhodesia and she married in 1972 Roy Tapson and they had 4 children: c.1. Tracy Tapson; c.2. Debra Tapson; c.3. Brian Tapson and c.4. Wayne Tapson
     
7.                           ([6]e) Donald Strancham Marillier,  the fifth child and third son of  Ronald F.S. Marillier  and Winifred M.Marillier nee Howard and he was born on 10.7.1924 in Sinoia, Rhodesia and he became a farmer. He died 5.12.1981, murdered on his farm 'Shubara',outside Sinoia, Rhodesia. [ Information required on his murder, etc.] Unmarried.
 
7.([6]f)  Althea Ruth Marillier,  their sixth child and third daughter and she was born on 16.4.1926 in Grahamstown.  She was married in Salisbury on 8.1.1944 to Ronald Maurice Davies, who was born 18.6.1917  in Cape Town and he became a Mining Surveyor.  Althea died in 1989, drowning off the beach at Durban, South Africa. They had five children:
 
8.(fa) Peter Eian Davies born 1944, Salisbury; married 1966 Lynn Mackay; c.1. Maxwell Peter Davies; c.2. Juliet Clare.  They emigrated to Britain.
 
   8. (fb) Barrie Vernon Davies born 1947, Bulawayo; married  Elizabeth Peacocke; c.1.Vaughan Barrie; c.2. William Ronald; c.3. Simon Eric; c.4. Stephen James
                                        
8. (fc) Veronica Ann Davies, born 1949, Bulawayo; married in 1970 to Peter Jones, who was born in 1947; c.1.Jason Peter Jones [m. Karen; c.(a).Linus; c(b). daughter] c.2. Virginia (Ginny) Ann Jones [m. David]; c.3. John-Paul.
      Living in Los Angeles, California.  
 
8. (fd)  Donald James Davies born 1953, Bulawayo; married Helen Barker in 1985; c.1. Cheryl Davies
 
 8. (fe)  Roy William Davies born 1960, Salisbury; married in 1982 Alison Williams; c.1. Sarah Jacqueline Davies; c.2. Clare Althea Davies; c.3. Leigh Ann Davies
 
7.([6]g)  David Thraile Marillier,  who was the fourth son and seventh child of  Ronald F.S.Marillier and Winifred M.Marillier nee Howard and he was born on 1.3.1929 in Salisbury, Rhodesia.  He became an Engine driver on the Rhodesian Railways married in 1953 Faith (Rose) Rosemary Grant, who was born on 28.9.1935 in Gwelo, Rhodesia and they had five children:
 
8.(ga) Sharon Rose Marillier, born 1953. married 1973 Peter Gunning; c.1 Melody Gunning, born 1979; c.2. Mathew Gunning, born 1983
 
      8.(gb) Eian Kevin Marillier, born 1955; married 1977 Alison Stokes.  They had one child:
 
 9.(ba) Michael Marillier
 
      8.(gc) Hazel Joy Marillier, born 1957, married 1978 (1st) Robin Bain, divorced 1980; c.1.Sandra Bain; c.2.David Thrale Bain; married (2nd) Bryan Loxton in 1982; c.1.Cheylene Loxton; c.2. Graham Loxton, divorced 1989; married (3rd) in 1992 Roy White
 
8.(gd) Frederick Mark Marillier, born 1960 Salisbury, Rhodesia; married 1980 Sue Marillier and they had 3 children:
 
9.(da) Laura Marillier
 
9.(db)Kevin Marillier
 
9.(dc)Brett Marillier
 
8.(ge) Basil William Marillier, born 1961, Salisbury, Rhodesia, married 1986 Sharon Truman and they had 2 children:
 
9.(ea) Karl Marillier
 
9.(eb) Sylvia Marillier
 
7.([6]h)  Guy Howard Marillier, who was the eighth and youngest child of Ronald F.S.Marillier and Winifred M.Marillier nee Howard and he was  born on 3.12.1931 in Salisbury and he became a brick layer; aschool caretaker; Manager of Ministry of Works Umvukwes, Karba, Sinoia; Maintenance Manager Richards Bay..  He married Phyllis Nora Webster in the Presbyterian Church in Salisbury on 5.10.1957 and she was born on 15.11.1938. She was the daughter of Ivan Reginald Webster and Nora Fletcher Webster nee Marillier.   They were in Sinoia for many years but left Rhodesia when it became Zimbabwe and Guy worked in Richard's Bay until he retired, when they settled in Steynsburg, South Africa.
 
     There were two children of this marriage:
 
8.(ha)  Desiree Cherie Marillier,  born 9.6.1958 in Salisbury.
She married Donald Peter Powell in Old Fort Chapel, Durban on 5.9.1982 and they have one daughter: c.1. Nicol Powell born in Durban
 
8.(hb)  Ivan Allan (called Allen) Marillier born 21.1.1960 in Salisbury.  He married Anne Botha in the Presbyterian Church in Durban in 1984 and they have two children: a son, Pascal Marc Marillier, born 18.9.1987 and a daughter, Jene  Monique Marillier, born 12.7.1989.
 
[To return to the younger children of George Edward Marillier and
                          Julia Marillier nee Muir]
 
       6.([5]b) George Edward (Ted) Marillier, the second son of George Marillier                                and Julia Marillier nee Muir, born 17.11.1890 in Potchefstroom, South Africa and he died in 1974 at Kadoma, Zimbabwe.  He  married Lydia Ida Alexander who was born 26.9.1893 also in Potchefstroom and she died in 1974 also in Kadoma, Zimbabwe.
 
6. ([5]c) Margarite (Daisy) Edith Marillier, their eldest daughter was born on 3.9.1892 and she died in Durban.  She married (1st) Gilbert (Paddy) Thomas Henderson and they had 4 children:  C.1 Sheila Henderson (born 1921); c.2. Patricia Henderson (born 1922); C.4. Kathleen Henderson (born 1925) and C.4.Horatio Henderson (born ?)
               Divorced 22.4.1966 and married (2nd) Robert Houghton Thomas
                       
6. ([5]d) Francis Leander Marillier, their third son and fourth child, married Cara Nicolls.
 
6. ([5]e) Eugene Charles Marillier, their fourth son and fifth child was born 9.5.1908 and he was murdered on 1.8.1967 in Elliot where he was farming.  He married (1st) Nelly Morley and they had one child:
 
7.(ea) Mark Anthony Marillier who was born on 26.2.1938 and died on 16.4.1949 in the Elliot district through a rifle accident.
 
Eugene Charles Marillier married (2nd) Milly Arangie  and she died 27.6.2001.  They had  4 children:
 
7.(eb) Rene Marillier who became a farmer.  (Post Box 1555,  Potchefstroom)
 
7.(ec) Antoinette Marillier
 
7.(ed) Rodney Marillier
7.(ee) Cynthia Marillier married (1st) Jack Henry Pittaway and they had a child: c.1.Vickey Pittaway.  Married (2nd) Riaan Lew and they had 2 children: c.1. Mia Lew and c.2. Ben Lew.  She was living in Elliot, Eastern Cape.

6.      ([5]f) Eric (Erick) Stanley Marillier, the sixth child of George Edward Marillier and Lydia Ida Marillier nee Alexander and he married Dorothy Cashel. He was a member of the Rhodesian Government. Issue ?

HF2b Howard Family In Rhodesia 2